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The basin

While the season is planetwide, all activity occurs in one ocean.

The seasons use the Lucarius Wind Scale, with categories 1 - 9, as well as tropical depression, tropical storm, and severe tropical storm.

The seasons officially run from June 1st to December 31st. However seasons can run from June 1st to June 1st of the next year, like the 2017 season which ran from June 3rd, 2017 to June 2nd, 2018, due to the seasons technically being year round from June 1st to June 1st next year due to a complex setup of the Danulean traditional new year occurring on June 1st and the official boundaries of the season.

Lucarius Wind Scale (LWS)

Tropical Depression: Under 39 mph(< 33.9 kn)

Tropical Storm: 40-54 mph(34.8-46.9 kn)

Severe Tropical Storm: 55-69 mph(47.8-60.0 kn)

C1 Hurricane: 70-84 mph(60.8-73.0 kn)

C2 Hurricane: 85-99 mph(73.9-86.0 kn)

C3 Major Hurricane; 100-119 mph(86.9-103.4 kn)

C4 Major Hurricane: 120-134 mph(104.3-116.4 kn)

C5 Major Hurricane: 135-149 mph(117.3-129.5 kn)

C6 Major Hurricane: 150-169 mph(130.3-146.9 kn)

C7 Major Hurricane: 170-189 mph(147.7-164.2 kn)

C8 Major Hurricane: 190-199 mph(165.1-172.9 kn)

C9 Major Hurricane: Over 200 mph(> 173.8 kn)

The season

2019 Danula Planetwide Cyclone Season
2019 Danula Summary 1205
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedJune 8th, 2019
Last system dissipatedDecember 4th, 2019
Strongest storm
NameJames
 • Maximum winds215 mph (345 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure870 mbar (hPa; 25.69 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions13
Total storms12
Hurricanes7
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
4
Total fatalities205 total
Total damage> $93.09 billion (2019 USD)
Danula cyclone seasons
2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021

The 2019 Danula Planetwide Cyclone Season was an event in tropical cyclone formation in the Danulean basin. The season's official bounds are June 1 to December 31, however storms can form year round, and storms forming between January 1 to June 1 are considered part of the previous season. The first official prediction was announced on May 5th, 2019. It predicted average to above average activity for the season. Since then, several more agencies released their predictions, most predicting an above average season. Overall, the season was barely an above average season, with 12 storms, 7 hurricanes, and 4 majors, barely reaching above average activity as noted by the Danula Weather Forecasting Center in the last of their scheduled tropical weather outlooks of the season.

The first system of the season developed on June 8th and eventually became Hurricane Anthony. The last system of June developed on June 25th, and eventually became a short lived storm named Belinda. In mid July, Chris developed, and eventually became the first major hurricane of the season as it reached its peak intensity as a category 6 hurricane, before weakening and becoming non tropical on July 21st. Four formed on July 31st, later peaking on August 1st, and becoming non-tropical on the same day.

Early on August 1st, Delilah formed, eventually becoming the second most intense storm of the season at the time on August 3rd, as a category 5 major hurricane, and then starting a trek towards the United States of Danula coast, culminating in a hurricane force landfall on August 10th in Floodston city, and dissipation late on August 11th. On August 13th, a weak tropical depression formed, eventually developing into Tropical Storm Erick, with it later dissipating on August 15th, not striking any land areas. On August 25th, Fern formed, and eventually became the most powerful system of the season until September 21st, as it made landfall in Noventra on August 29th with category 6 strength winds, and the Turklandian Province of Novandur as a major hurricane later on the same day, dissipating on August 31st. Meanwhile, Gabe formed on August 26th as Tropical Depression Eight, and eventually reached peak intensity as a severe tropical storm, before dissipating on August 30th.

On September 14th, Subtropical Storm Helena formed from a monsoonal trough, and remained a weak subtropical or tropical storm up until it made landfall and dissipated on September 19th, while Isla developed from a cold core low on September 17th, and remained a subtropical storm up until it dissipated, also on September 19th. Meanwhile, on September 18th, Tropical Storm James formed from a poorly forecast tropical wave, and gradually intensified up until its peak intensity on September 22nd, becoming the strongest and most intense hurricane on record in Danula, breaking several records for strongest landfalls along the way, before starting a weakening trend due to deteriorating conditions as it moved out to sea, becoming the largest hurricane of the season in the process, eventually losing its tropical characteristics on September 27th as a tropical depression.

Meanwhile, on October 13th, a hurricane force Potential Tropical Cyclone was designated from a broad frontal and cold core extratropical low, that developed into Tropical Storm Kelly on October 16th, already having done some damage. Eventually, on October 19th, Kelly nearly made landfall in Southern Waleston as a large and high end category 2 hurricane, and on the same day, attained major hurricane force wind speeds after landfall, over land, as an extratropical cyclone, eventually receiving its last advisory on October 20th due to weakening and cancellation of tropical cyclone warnings. Finally, on December 2nd, Lauren formed, peaking as a 90 mph category 2 hurricane on December 3rd, before turning extratropical early on December 5th, failing to hit or impact any land areas.

Season summary

The first system of the season developed on June 8th, and quickly intensified to peak on June 12th as Hurricane Anthony, dissipating on June 13th, and becoming the second A named storm in a row to become a hurricane in June. On June 25th, a tropical depression formed, eventually becoming Tropical Storm Belinda, before becoming non-tropical on June 29th. On July 12th, Tropical Storm Chris formed, and quickly intensified, reaching peak intensity as a category 6 hurricane on July 15th, before weakening and dissipating on July 21st. Four formed on July 31st, later peaking and becoming non-tropical on August 1st, never reaching tropical storm status. On August 1st, Delilah formed, reaching peak intensity as a strong category 5 hurricane on August 3rd, and eventually starting a long journey towards the United States of Danula coast as it accelerated east-southeast, making landfall in Floodston City as a category 1 hurricane on August 10th and bringing severe rainfall into the area. The hurricane finally dissipated on August 11th. On August 13th, Tropical Depression Six formed, becoming Tropical Storm Erick on the same day. However, it remained weak, and eventually dissipated on August 15th, without hitting any land. On August 25th, Tropical Storm Fern formed, and started rapidly intensifying, reaching peak intensity on August 29th as the most powerful system of the season until September 21st, while making landfall in the main island of Noventra as a powerful category 6 hurricane, and later made landfall in the Turklandian province of Novandur as a major hurricane, eventually dissipating on August 31st. Meanwhile, on August 26th, Tropical Depression Eight developed, and on August 27th, became a tropical storm and was given the name Gabe. Gabe eventually peaked as a severe tropical storm on August 28th, before dissipating on August 30th in unfavorable conditions. On September 14th, Subtropical Storm Helena developed from a monsoon trough, and remained broad and slow moving as it became tropical a few days later, eventually finally making landfall and dissipating on September 19th. Meanwhile, Isla was a short lived subtropical storm that generally was slow moving, and hit no land areas, as it formed on September 17th, and dissipated on September 19th as well. On September 18th, Tropical Storm James formed from a poorly forecast tropical wave, and gradually intensified up until its peak intensity on September 22nd, becoming the strongest and most intense hurricane on record in Danula with a wind speed reaching 215 mph and its pressure dropping to 870 mbar, breaking several records for strongest landfalls along the way, before starting a weakening trend due to deteriorating conditions as it moved out to sea, becoming the largest hurricane of the season in the process, eventually losing its tropical characteristics on September 27th as an extremely broad and disorganized tropical depression. Meanwhile, on October 13th, a hurricane force Potential Tropical Cyclone was designated from a broad frontal and cold core extratropical low, that developed into Tropical Storm Kelly on October 16th, already having done some damage. Eventually, on October 19th, Kelly nearly made landfall in Southern Waleston as a large and high end category 2 hurricane, and on the same day, attained major hurricane force wind speeds after landfall, over land, as an extratropical cyclone, eventually receiving its last advisory on October 20th due to weakening and cancellation of tropical cyclone warnings. Finally, on December 2nd, Lauren formed, peaking as a 90 mph category 2 hurricane on December 3rd, before turning extratropical early on December 5th, failing to hit or impact any land areas.

Seasonal forecasts

Predictions of tropical activity in the 2019 season
Source Date Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Average (1981-2010) 13 7 3
Record high activity 2018 - 42 2018 - 30 2018 - 25
Record low activity 1989 - 7 1989 - 3* 1989 - 0*
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DWFC May 5, 2019 17-19 9-11 6-7
DHC May 5, 2019 28 17 12
HCHC May 5, 2019 19 12 8
HLMA May 5, 2019 20-26 15-19 10-12
LCA May 5, 2019 27-33 16-19 10-13
IMD May 6, 2019 26 16 10
NCWMC May 14, 2019 29-33 20-22 7-10
NAHC May 18, 2019 17-22 9-14 4-9
DWFC June 1, 2019 19-24 11-13 7-9
HMTCWC June 1, 2019 31 29 19
HWHC June 9, 2019 15 9 7
SHMC June 20, 2019 28 16 10
KWC June 21, 2019 33 27 20
CGFC July 7, 2019 25 12 8
SSC July 21, 2019 32 21 13
DWFC August 15, 2019 17-21 8-11 3-6
PWC August 17, 2019 18-25 9-13 4-7
DWFC September 10, 2019 14-18 5-8 3-5
DWFC October 1, 2019 10-13 5-7 4-5
NAHC October 6, 2019 11-14 6-8 5-6
UHC October 6, 2019 10-12 5-6 4-5
IDKHC November 9, 2019 12-17 4-8 3-6
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Actual activity
12 7 4

Pre-season outlooks

On May 5th, 2019, the DWFC issued its first prediction for the season, predicting average to above average activity, due to the La Nina that fueled the 2018 season still being predicted to be present for most of the 2019 season. On the same day, the DHC released its prediction, calling for a hyperactive season, HCHC calling for an above average season, HLMA predicting an above average to hyperactive season, and LCA predicting a hyperactive season. On the next day, the IMD released their prediction, predicting a hyperactive season due to favorable conditions.

On May 14th, the NCWMC released their first prediction on the basin ever, predicting a hyperactive season. The NAHC released their initial prediction for the season on May 18th, predicting an average to above average season. On June 1st, the DWFC issued an updated forecast for the season, predicting above average activity still. On the same day, HMTCWC issued their first outlook on the basin in history, predicting a hyperactive season following the record breaking 2018 season.

Mid-season outlooks

On June 9th, the Hurricane Wars Hurricane Center predicted an above average season in their first outlook on the basin on record. On June 20th, the SHMC predicted an above average to hyperactive season, while on the next day, KWC predicted a hyperactive season, approaching the activity of 2018. The CGFC also predicted a hyperactive season on July 7th, with 25 named storms, 12 hurricanes, and 8 major hurricanes. On July 21st, the Staniper Cyclone Center issued their outlook for the season, predicting 32 named storms, 21 hurricanes, and 13 majors, with an overall hyperactive outlook. On August 15th, the DWFC issued another updated forecast, now predicting an above average season with slightly lower numbers due to low storm formation in August.

Following that, on August 17th, the PWC released their first outlook of the season, predicting a similarly above average season, with a high likelihood of hyperactivity. On September 10th, the DWFC released an updated outlook to account for lower than expected peak season activity, expecting 14 to 18 storms, 5 to 8 hurricanes, and 3 to 5 major hurricanes, with the basin activity overall being near average to marginally above average. On October 1st, the DWFC updated their forecast yet again, now expecting 10 to 13 named storms, 5 to 7 hurricanes, and 4 to 5 major hurricanes, noting highly unfavorable conditions with the onset of an unfavorable sea surface temperature phase. On October 6th, the NAHC released their prediction for the season, predicting slightly higher numbers than the DWFC due to the center expecting warm currents to persist a few days longer than expected, resulting in slightly more favorable conditions than DWFC anticipates, while UHC went the opposite way with their prediction, expecting worse conditions than the DWFC due to a quick onset of extremely unfavorable, cold currents. Finally, the IDKHC prediction, which came out on November 9th, predicted more activity, anticipating a season revival in the late season, potentially in the off season too. However, due to a error at the predicting center, the lower bounds for hurricane and major hurricane strength systems were lower than the number of systems of that strength that had already occurred.

Systems

Hurricane Anthony

Category 1 hurricane (LWS)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
2019 Danula Anthony peak 2019 Danula Anthony track
DurationJune 8th – June 13th
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) 1-min
991 mbar (hPa)
A Potential Tropical Cyclone was designated on June 3rd with low chances of formation. Over the next few days, as it moved east, its organization increased, and its chances of tropical cyclogenesis rose. At 12:00 UTC June 8th, it was found to have become a tropical depression. It slowly intensified, and was upgraded to a tropical storm at 12:00 UTC June 9th, and given the name Anthony. At 18:00 UTC June 10th, it became a severe tropical storm. It made landfall near Floodston city at 06:00 UTC June 12th, as a minimal category 1 hurricane. After landfall, it rapidly weakened, and eventually dissipated over land as a tropical depression, shortly after 12:00 UTC June 13th. The final damage report estimates 4 fatalities, and $30 million (2019 USD) in damages, mostly due to the small size and weak strength of the system when it impacted land. Minor impacts were felt in and around Floodston, and were overshadowed by Delilah later during the season.

Tropical Storm Belinda

Tropical storm (LWS and SSHWS)
2019 Danula Belinda peak 2019 Danula Belinda track
DurationJune 25th – June 29th
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) 1-min
996 mbar (hPa)
A Potential Tropical Cyclone was designated on June 24th. On June 25th, at 18:00 UTC, it was designated a tropical depression due to high organization. Intensification continued, and at 18:00 UTC June 26th, the depression was upgraded to a tropical storm and named Belinda. Belinda continued intensifying, and reached its peak intensity as it made landfall at 06:00 UTC June 28th, with its pressure reaching 996 mbar and its wind speeds reaching 45 mph. After landfall, it weakened to a tropical depression as it moved over the island. Weakening continued, until 18:00 UTC June 29th, when Belinda degenerated into a remnant low. Its remnants dissipated just after 18:00 UTC on June 30th. Its impacts on land were minor, with no recorded damages or deaths.

Hurricane Chris

Category 6 hurricane (LWS)
Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaChris1800ZJul15 2019 Danula Chris track
DurationJuly 12th – July 21st
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) 1-min
919 mbar (hPa)
In early July, a disturbance developed over the Danulean Northern Main Development Region, and organized in favorable conditions. At 12:00 UTC July 12th, the DWFC deemed the disturbance to have become a tropical cyclone, and since it had confirmed storm force winds, it was immediately designated as Tropical Storm Chris. At 18:00 UTC July 14th, it intensified to a hurricane as confirmed by recon. DWFC confirmed that at 03:00 UTC July 15th, Chris became a major hurricane with 100 mph winds. Chris continued to intensify, and peaked at 18:00 UTC July 15th as a 155 mph category 6 hurricane, after which it started to weaken. Chris weakened below major hurricane status at 06:00 UTC July 18th, after which its rate of weakening slowed down. It weakened below hurricane status on July 19th. At 18:00 UTC July 21st, it degenerated into a remnant low. It dissipated at 18:00 UTC July 22nd, when it was absorbed by a larger disturbance. Since Chris did not impact any land areas, it did not cause any damages or fatalities.

Tropical Depression Four

Tropical depression (LWS and SSHWS)
2019DanulaFour1200ZAug01 2019 Danula Four track
DurationJuly 31st – August 1st
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) 1-min
1004 mbar (hPa)
In late July, a tropical disturbance was given low chances of tropical cyclone formation. It received little model support, and its chances were slightly lowered as it neared land areas. However, as model support rapidly increased, so did its chances of formation. Eventually, as it was moving over land areas, its formation was guaranteed. At 18:00 UTC July 31st, just as it entered the Darafura Sea, DWFC estimates found the system to have a closed circulation, which resulted in its designation as a tropical depression, since it had 30 mph winds. Its formation was unusual, since it formed just barely on land. The depression slowly intensified, eventually peaking at 12:00 UTC August 1st, with wind speeds of 35 mph, and a pressure of 1004 mbar. It became non-tropical at 18:00 UTC, when its circulation became open, thus not qualifying for tropical cyclone criteria. Its impacts on land were minor, with no reported damages and no recorded deaths.

Hurricane Delilah

Category 5 hurricane (LWS)
Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaDelilah1800ZAug3 2019 Danula Delilah track
DurationAugust 1st – August 11th
Peak intensity140 mph (220 km/h) 1-min
947 mbar (hPa)
In late July, a tropical disturbance formed over the Main Development Region of the Damala Ocean. It organized while producing showers over water, eventually gaining Invest designation. At 18:00 UTC July 31st, it was determined to have been near formation. At 00:00 UTC August 1st, the DWFC determined the disturbance to have developed into a tropical cyclone, and it was immediately given tropical storm designation, receiving the name Delilah. Delilah intensified, and attained hurricane status at 18:00 UTC August 2nd. After that, rapid intensification started, culminating in Delilah reaching peak intensity at 18:00 UTC August 3rd, with 140 mph category 5 status. Afterwards, Delilah rapidly weakened due to worsening conditions. At 00:00 UTC August 5th, Delilah weakened below major hurricane status, as its eye collapsed and clouded over. Finally, at 00:00 UTC August 7th, Delilah weakened below hurricane status, with winds of 65 mph. However, its weakening was short lived, as it reattained hurricane status at 18:00 UTC August 8th. The hurricane slowly intensified up until it made landfall, at 12:00 UTC August 10th, as a 80 mph category 1 hurricane, with a pressure of 984 mbar. While the conditions for Delilah to intensify a lot more before landfall were present, the storm's fast forward motion denied any further intensification than 5 miles per hour per day. After landfall, it weakened. By 06:00 UTC August 11th, Delilah had weakened to a mere tropical depression, and at 18:00 UTC, ended its long and destructive track, becoming a remnant low over the southern United States of Danula. Reports of a 5 foot storm surge were confirmed all across the Floodston state coastline, and reports of 25 inches of isolated rainfall were verified in early September. Floodston city experienced at least 15 inches of rainfall, with disastrous flooding resulting from the combination of the rainfall and the surge. The final damage estimate for Delilah was $13.16 billion (2019 USD), with Delilah being the worst flooding event in the area since Hurricane Stan of 2018. 41 deaths were recorded from the hurricane, all concentrated in Floodston City.

Tropical Storm Erick

Tropical storm (LWS and SSHWS)
2019DanulaErick1800ZAug14 2019 Danula Erick track
DurationAugust 13th – August 15th
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) 1-min
1005 mbar (hPa)
In mid August, a disturbance developed in the Darafura Sea, and was given a low chance of formation. However, as it slowly moved east, its probabilities were increased as conditions became more favorable, and at 12:00 UTC August 13th, the formation of a small tropical depression was confirmed, making it the sixth system of the season. The depression intensified into a tropical storm at 18:00 UTC of the same day, and was given the name Erick. Newly named Erick struggled to intensify in marginally favorable conditions, and remained at the same intensity for almost another two days. At 12:00 UTC August 15th, Erick weakened to a tropical depression. Finally, at 18:00 UTC, the system degenerated into a remnant low, as its closed circulation opened up into a trough. Its impacts on land were minor, with no recorded damages or deaths.

Hurricane Fern

Category 6 hurricane (LWS)
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaFern1200ZAug29 2019 Danula Fern track
DurationAugust 25th – August 31st
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) 1-min
913 mbar (hPa)

}A tropical wave formed in late August, and moved generally east, eventually gaining Invest status as its chances of tropical cyclogenesis were increased to HIGH. On August 23rd, it was given Potential Tropical Cyclone designation, as several locations received hurricane watches ahead of the system. The system continued to organize, and at 18:00 UTC August 25th, developed into a true tropical storm, receiving the name Fern. Fern continued strengthening, and at 12:00 UTC August 26th, it attained 70 mph winds, becoming the fourth hurricane of the season. At 06:00 UTC August 27th, Fern was verified to have reached a strength of 100 miles per hour, and was thus upgraded to a major hurricane. Finally, at 12:00 UTC August 29th, Fern reached peak intensity as a 160 mph hurricane, as it made landfall in the largest island of Noventra. After landfall, it weakened to 120 mph due to land interaction. Just after 18:00 UTC, Fern made landfall in the Turklandian province of Novandur, as a 120 mph hurricane, and afterwards it started to rapidly weaken. On August 30th, all warnings associated with Fern were canceled, as the storm moved farther inland and weakened. The storm weakened below tropical storm status by 00:00 UTC August 31st, and finally became a remnant low at 12:00 UTC, dissipating shortly after 18:00 UTC. Fern caused $4.9 billion (2019 USD) in damages and 21 deaths respectively from its category 6 force landfall with a moderately large wind field, with this being the final estimate.

Severe Tropical Storm Gabe

Severe Tropical storm (LWS)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
2019DanulaGabe1800ZAug28 2019 Danula Gabe track
DurationAugust 26th – August 30th
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) 1-min
1001 mbar (hPa)

Another tropical wave formed in mid to late August, and moved generally east, organizing along the way, eventually getting designated as an Invest while its chances of tropical cyclone development rose. At 18:00 UTC August 26th, it was declared to be a tropical depression, having attained all required characteristics of a tropical cyclone, with 35 mph winds, a defined circulation, and sustained convection. The system struggled to intensify for the first few hours, however it eventually began to intensify, attaining tropical storm status at 18:00 UTC August 27th, and being given the name Gabe. At 18:00 UTC August 28th, Gabe reached peak intensity in deteriorating conditions, as a 60 mile per hour severe tropical storm. After peak intensity, the storm began to weaken in increasing shear and prominent dry air. At 00:00 UTC August 30th, Gabe weakened below tropical storm status. Finally, at 18:00 UTC August 30th, Gabe degenerated into a remnant low, after its convection was entirely gone. Gabe caused no damages or deaths, and did not impact land in any way.

Tropical Storm Helena

Tropical storm (LWS and SSHWS)
2019DanulaHelena1800ZSep18 2019 Danula Helena track
DurationSeptember 14th – September 19th
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) 1-min
985 mbar (hPa)

In mid September, a disturbance formed in the monsoonal trough, and was eventually designated as an Area of Interest by the Danula Weather Forecasting Center, being given low chances of tropical cyclone development. However, over the following days, it organized and developed, eventually being given Potential Tropical Cyclone designation on September 13th, as warnings were issued for the system. At 15:00 UTC September 14th, a recon plane discovered that the disturbance had developed a closed center indicative of subtropical cyclone status, and at 18:00 UTC, the system was officially designated Subtropical Storm Helena. The storm reached peak intensity at 18:00 UTC September 15th as a 50 mph subtropical storm, before weakening as it started its quick tropical transition. At 00:00 UTC September 16th, Helena was determined to have slightly weakened, and became tropical. However, Helena eventually restrengthened to 50 mph as a tropical system at 18:00 UTC September 17th. At 18:00 UTC September 18th, Helena reached its secondary peak intensity, as a 50 mph tropical storm with a pressure of 985 mbar - exactly the same as its first peak intensity. At 00:00 UTC September 19th, it finally made landfall in Turkland, still as a 50 mph tropical storm. After landfall, Helena weakened, and finally dissipated at 18:00 UTC. Its impacts are currently being recorded, and are estimated to be minor so far, with no reports of deaths.

Subtropical Storm Isla

Subtropical storm (LWS and SSHWS)
2019DanulaIsla1800ZSep18 2019 Danula Isla track
DurationSeptember 17th – September 19th
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) 1-min
986 mbar (hPa)

In the middle of September, a cold core low formed over the Darafura sea. It was anticipated to not develop further, as conditions were unfavorable and model support was low. However, at 06:00 UTC September 17th, the system was determined to have attained subtropical storm status as its core barely became warm and asymmetric, and was named Isla. The storm reached peak intensity at 18:00 UTC September 18th, as a 50 mph subtropical storm with a pressure of 986 mbar, based on recon aircraft measurements. Afterwards, it weakened, and at 18:00 UTC September 19th, was redesignated an extratropical cyclone, as it lost its subtropical warm core and became a frontal system. Isla did not cause any reported damages and no recorded deaths, due to not making any landfalls or having any significant impacts.

Hurricane James

Category 9 hurricane (LWS)
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaJames1800ZSep22 2019 Danula James track
DurationSeptember 18th – September 27th
Peak intensity215 mph (345 km/h) 1-min
870 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave formed over the Gulf of Floodston in mid September, and rapidly organized into an Area of Interest, which was given a HIGH chance of formation on September 16th. To reflect for model runs expecting an extremely strong system hitting land, the disturbance was given a historic "CATASTROPHIC" designation, and eventually gained Potential Tropical Cyclone status on the same day as warnings went into effect. At 00:00 UTC September 18th, the system was determined to have developed into a tropical storm, and was given the name James. James strengthened, and at 18:00 UTC, was upgraded to a hurricane, the fifth of the season. At 06:00 UTC September 19th, a recon flight discovered that James had major hurricane force sustained winds, and therefore, the hurricane was upgraded to be the fourth major hurricane of the season. James then underwent a cycle of rapid strengthening and holding strength for the next two days, reaching 170 mph early on September 21st, becoming the first Category 7 hurricane of the season. At 14:00 UTC September 21st, James became the most intense hurricane of the season, with a pressure of 907 mbar. At 15:00 UTC, James made landfall on the Outer Islands of the state of Floodston, as a 190 mph Category 8 hurricane with a pressure of 898 mbar. James continued strengthening after that, and at 12:00 UTC September 22nd, made landfall in the southernmost of the Outer Islands of the State of Andreaston, setting the record for the strongest landfall in the Danulean Basin. The hurricane still strengthened, and at 18:00 UTC, just as it made landfall in the outer islands of the state of Andreaston, it became the strongest hurricane on record in the basin, with winds up to 215 mph and a pressure down to 870 mbar, also beating its own record for the strongest and most intense landfall. Afterwards, James began weakening and expanding as upwelling from its slow movement began to take a toll on its strength. At 00:00 UTC September 25th, James weakened below major hurricane strength, with a wind field that was slowly shrinking, and an expanding and collapsing eye. James continued its weakening trend, and at 00:00 UTC September 26th, weakened below hurricane strength, with extremely disorganized convection, and an eye that was no longer present. Finally, at 12:00 UTC September 27th, the system was determined to no longer be a tropical cyclone, with its final advisory being issued at 18:00 UTC. James was a devastating hurricane, leaving a trail of complete destruction along the path of its eye. Damages include severely damaged concrete buildings, entire buildings washed away, trees thrown through the air, and asphalt torn off the streets, all indicative of EF5 level damage. Damages are currently estimated to be at least $25 billion (2019 USD), with 106 recorded deaths. This makes James the costliest and deadliest storm of the season, as well as the single most devastating storm, with the most severe impacts to areas it struck.

Hurricane Kelly

Category 2 hurricane (LWS)
Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaKelly0600ZOct19 2019 Danula Kelly track
DurationOctober 16th – October 19th
Peak intensity95 mph (155 km/h) 1-min
949 mbar (hPa)

An extratropical cyclone formed over the northern Damala Ocean around October 10th, being a mere small and weak frontal low with a low support for any Tropical Weather Outlook worthy development. On October 11th, however, things changed drastically, with models introducing a large amount of support for the formation of the system, and thus, its formation area was introduced into the Tropical Weather Outlook on the same day with medium chances of tropical cyclone formation. The next day, it already had risen to a high chance of development, and on the 13th of October, was given Potential Tropical Cyclone designation, as multiple warnings came into effect for its extratropical landfall in Iseland, and further impacts after its tropical cyclogenesis. After a few days of not developing due to land interaction, at 18:00 UTC October 16th, the system finally completed its transition, and was designated a tropical storm, getting the name Kelly. Kelly continued strengthening, and at 18:00 UTC October 17th, strengthened into a category 1 hurricane. However, as Kelly traversed further south, it started re-acquiring extratropical characteristics, and at 12:00 UTC October 19th, just as it made landfall along the southern Waleston coastline, it transitioned into a 95 mph extratropical cyclone. At 18:00 UTC of the same day, Kelly, unusually, acquired major hurricane force winds as a non-tropical cyclone, while already being located over land. Afterwards, the cyclone weakened, eventually receiving its last advisory by the Danula Weather Forecasting Center at 18:00 UTC October 20th due to the complete cancellation of tropical cyclone warnings, despite still being a hurricane force cyclone with a large area under its influence. So far, no official damage estimate is out, however, 33 deaths have been recorded over the storm's entire track (including its initial impacts in Iseland), due to major hurricane force winds impacting a large swath of land in South Waleston, and 15 foot storm surge extending over a large part of the South Waleston coastline, while damages are so far estimated at $50 billion (2019 USD) due to the area being heavily unprepared for storms of such magnitude.

Hurricane Lauren

Category 2 hurricane (LWS)
Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
2019DanulaLauren1800ZDec3 2019 Danula Lauren track
DurationDecember 2nd – December 4th
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) 1-min
983 mbar (hPa)

A weak frontal extratropical low was forecast to develop by models over the Damala Ocean in late November, and was designated as a potential area for a low probability of tropical cyclone development. As the days went on, the low did develop, and was given a MEDIUM chance of tropical cyclogenesis. However, it unexpectedly started acquiring tropical cyclone characteristics very rapidly, and received a near 100% chance of formation at a special outlook late on December 1st. At 06:00 UTC December 2nd, the Danula Weather Forecasting Center determined that the low had developed into a tropical cyclone, and immediately designated Severe Tropical Storm Lauren, already with wind speeds reaching 65 mph. By 12:00 UTC of the same day, Lauren had already strengthened into a minimal hurricane, and was quickly organizing into a mature far southern latitude late season hurricane, with a clear eye and a clear ring of convection. Afterwards, Lauren continued its strengthening phase, eventually reaching its peak intensity at 18:00 UTC December 3rd. After peak intensity, due to deteriorating conditions, the hurricane started weakening. As it weakened, Lauren started to turn into an extratropical cyclone as well. And, at 00:00 UTC December 5th, the Danula Weather Forecasting Center analysis determined that the hurricane was no longer a tropical or subtropical cyclone, leading to the Danula Weather Forecasting Center classifying it as an extratropical cyclone. Its final advisory was issued at 06:00 UTC of the same day, after which the cyclone was no longer tracked by the Danula Weather Forecasting Center. Lauren caused absolutely nothing in damages and resulted in no deaths, as it did not impact land in any way.

Storm names

These are the names that will be used to name tropical cyclones in the 2019 season. This list was last used in 2017 and will be used for the next time in 2021, with the exception of the names retired due to their impacts.

  • Anthony
  • Belinda
  • Chris
  • Delilah
  • Erick
  • Fern
  • Gabe
  • Helena
  • Isla
  • James
  • Kelly
  • Lauren
  • Mauricia (unused)
  • Nicki (unused)
  • Orva (unused)
  • Peggy (unused)
  • Rhoda (unused)
  • Sally (unused)
  • Thomas (unused)
  • Valencia (unused)
  • Winona (unused)

Season effects

This is a table of the storms and their effects in the 2019 Danula Planetwide Cyclone Season. This table includes the storm's names, duration, peak intensity, Areas affected (bold indicates made landfall in that region at least once), damages, and death totals. Deaths in parentheses are additional and indirect (an example of an indirect death would be a traffic accident), but are still storm-related. Damage and deaths include totals while the storm was extratropical, a wave or a low. All of the damage figures are in 2019 USD (the listed damage figure is in millions).

2019 Danula Planetwide Cyclone Season statistics
Storm
name
Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths


Anthony June 8 – June 13 Category 1 hurricane 70 mph (110 km/h) 991 United States of Danula 30 4
Belinda June 25 – June 29 Tropical storm 45 mph (75 km/h) 996 Northern Odileland Minimal None
Chris July 12 – July 21 Category 6 hurricane 155 mph (250 km/h) 919 None None None
Four July 31 – August 1 Tropical depression 35 mph (55 km/h) 1004 Iseland, Waleston None None
Delilah August 1 – August 11 Category 5 hurricane 140 mph (220 km/h) 947 United States of Danula 13160 41
Erick August 13 – August 15 Tropical storm 40 mph (65 km/h) 1005 None None None
Fern August 25 – August 31 Category 6 hurricane 160 mph (260 km/h) 913 Turkland 4900 21
Gabe August 26 – August 30 Severe tropical storm 60 mph (95 km/h) 1001 None None None
Helena September 14 – September 19 Tropical storm 50 mph (85 km/h) 985 Turkland Minor None
Isla September 17 – September 19 Tropical storm 50 mph (85 km/h) 986 None None None
James September 18 – September 27 Category 9 hurricane 215 mph (345 km/h) 870 Outer Islands of the United States of Danula 25000 106
Kelly October 16 – October 19 Category 2 hurricane 95 mph (155 km/h) 949 Iseland, Waleston 50000 33
Lauren December 2 – December 4 Category 2 hurricane 90 mph (150 km/h) 983 None None None
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