FANDOM


2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season (Disasters GoOn's version)
First system formed May 10, 2020
Last system dissipated December 25, 2020
Strongest storm Michael – 550 mbar (hPa) (16.25 inHg), 450 mph (720 km/h) (1-minute sustained)
Total depressions 34 (Record)
Total storms 30 (Record)
Hurricanes 25 (Record)
Major hurricanes (Cat. 3+) 16 (Record)
Total fatalities 62,000,000
Total damage ~ $7500 billion (2020 USD)
Atlantic hurricane seasons
2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season was the beginning of the end for many of the countries in the Atlantic Basin, as, thanks to a small-scale war that somehow caused methane releases in the Arctic Basin, global temperatures skyrocketed, producing hurricanes that reached levels never before seen. The strongest was a hurricane named Michael, which reached the city of New York as a 1,500-mile-wide, 410-mph storm system.

Other notorious hurricanes included Harold, a Category 7 hurricane that hit Houston on August 7, 2020, and Hurricane Cristobal, a Category 5 hurricane that hit Norfolk, Virginia.

Background

Global temperatures were already 0.2*C warmer than in 2014 due to Global Warming thanks in part to increased levels of CO2 because of a more technologically advanced world, which led to a minor increase in hurricane strength and, more surprisingly, in frequency, with the world gaining "two extra tropical storms," according to one climatologist.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season was expected to be a normal season, with the National Weather Service predicting that there would be 15 total storms, 10 of which would turn into hurricanes, with two of them expected to be a major storm..But a small-scale war between the US and Russia, in a battle called "Battle of the Arctic" (caused by tensions over who has rights to the oil in the Arctic), caused methane hydrates to rupture, releasing an estimated 50 gigatons (approximately 50 billion metric tons) of methane to be released from the ocean. Due to methane being an incredibly powerful greenhouse gas (it is between 20 to 34 times more powerful than Carbon Dioxide is), the Arctic warmed to the point that more ice melted, releasing more methane reserves and beginning a global apocalypse.

The tremendous amounts of methane caused global temperatures to skyrocket, increasing ocean temperatures and causing intense storms to increase in intensity and size, and also causing sea levels to rise quickly.

Storms

Hurricane Aaron

Main article: Hurricane Aaron
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationMay 10 – May 27
Peak intensity170 mph (270 km/h) (1-min)  900 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Aaron was a major hurricane that was unusual due to the fact that it was the strongest hurricane recorded in May. When it hit the Bahamas on May 22, the storm system was also large, with hurricane-force winds extending about 135 miles (217 km) from the eye. The storm system was estimated to have packed winds of approximately 155 mph (250 km/h), equivalent to a high-end Category 4 hurricane. The storm system killed 208 in the Bahamas and caused over $7.5 billion in damage. The storm system moved north, eventually hitting Charleston, South Carolina on May 24, killing nearly 1,000 people and causing another $40 billion in damage.

Tropical Storm Beth

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationMay 15 – May 21
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  988 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Beth stayed out into the ocean and didn't affect any land masses.






Hurricane Chris

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationMay 25 – May 30
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Same as Anthony.






Tropical Depression 04

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationMay 30 – June 3
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1003 mbar (hPa)

Same as Anthony and Beth.






Hurricane Danielle

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 2 – June 9
Peak intensity175 mph (280 km/h) (1-min)  900 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Danielle was the first Category 5 hurricane of the season, and it was a major hurricane at that. The hurricane intensified from a Category 3 to a Category 5 within 12 hours between June 6 and June 7. The storm maintained that intensity until it hit Belize City, Belize at peak intensity. At the same time, it was estimated to have had a diameter exceeding 350 miles across. The hurricane's 175 mph (280 km/h) winds and 26-foot storm surge killed over 2,350 people in Belize City and surrounding areas, and caused over $25 billion in damage. It crossed through the Yucatan Peninsula at up to 20 mph (32 km/h), exiting into the Bay of Campache as a Category 2 hurricane. It intensified back into Category 3 hurricane, hitting Veracruz, Mexico as a 300-mile-wide, 125-mph storm, killing another 150 people in the region and causing $15 billion in damages.



Hurricane Eduardo

Main article: Hurricane Eduardo
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 8 – June 20
Peak intensity190 mph (305 km/h) (1-min)  893 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Eduardo was the next system to develop into a major storm system. After trucking through the Atlantic ocean for several days, the storm system reached its maximum peak of 190 mph (305 km/h) winds and 893 millibar pressure recording. The storm then hit Norfolk, Virginia as a 175 mph (280 km/h) hurricane. Its enormous circulation affected areas as far north as New Jersey and New York, well over 200 miles from the eye of the storm. Over 2,000 were dead and up to $100 billion in damage was done to Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Washington, D.C., making this storm the deadliest U.S. tropical cyclone in more than nine decades, since the Florida hurricane of 1928 killed 2,500 in Southern Florida.



Hurricane Faith

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 10 – June 14
Peak intensity75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  983 mbar (hPa)

Was a weak hurricane that didn't affect land.

Hurricane Gert

Main article: Hurricane Gert (2020)
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 20 – July 5
Peak intensity200 mph (325 km/h) (1-min)  876 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Gert developed into a hurricane on June 21 after traveling the ocean for several days. One day before making landfall in the Bahamas, on June 24, Hurricane Gert rapidly intensified into a major tropical system. It then directly slammed into Nassau at peak intensity, killing 500. Hours later, the storm then made landfall in Miami as a 500-mile-wide, 200 mph (320 km/h) storm, producing a 26-foot storm surge that killed 1,650 in Florida. The storm, when it made landfall at peak strength, became the strongest landfalling hurricane in US history, and the most intense landfalling hurricane in US history.

The storm's fast ground speed (which was estimated to be higher than 15 mph) helped it cross the Florida Peninsula in just 7 hours, weakening the storm into a low-end Category 4 hurricane, with winds of up to 135 mph (217 km/h). It then intensified back into a 190-mph storm system, with hurricane-force winds extending 75 miles from the eye. The storm system made landfall at Corpus Christi as a 185-mph storm, producing a 25-foot storm surge. The hurricane killed 1,950 in the city and the surrounding areas.

All total, the hurricane killed over 4,050 people, and caused over $300 billion.

Hurricane Harold

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 28 – July 4
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

The hurricane formed in the Gulf of Mexico, and hit Haiti as a Category 2 hurricane. Its enormous size and storm surge killed dozens in Hispaniola. But the mountainous areas in Haiti disrupted the core of the storm, causing the storm to tear itself apart.






Tropical Storm Ingrid

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJune 28 – July 2
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Didn't affect land at all.






Hurricane James

Main article: Hurricane James
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationJuly 8 – July 23
Peak intensity180 mph (285 km/h) (1-min)  895 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane James formed on July 8, hundreds of miles west of the Cape Verde Islands. After several more days of intensification, on July 21, Hurricane James made landfall in Savannah, Georgia as a high-end, 500-mile-wide Category 5 hurricane, producing a storm surge of 35 feet. The storm surge and high winds caused total destruction in Savannah and other cities within a 150-mile diameter. The high winds and storm surge killed a total of 12,000 people (most in Georgia), becoming the deadliest national disaster in US history.

Hurricane Karl

Main article: Hurricane Karl (2020)
Category 7 hurricane (NHC)
Katrina 
DurationJuly 24 – August 10
Peak intensity235 mph (380 km/h) (1-min)  833 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Karl developed into a tropical storm 500 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands, then steadily intensified into a Category 3 hurricane. Just before hitting the Windward Islands, on August 1, it intensified into a low-end Category 5 hurricane, and it hit the island of Dominica at peak intensity, killing over 1,000 people on the Windward Islands. The storm system then continued to intensify, eventually hitting Jamaica as an intense, 200 mph, 350-mile-wide storm system on August 4. The storm killed 2,000 on the island, of which over 1,600 were in Kingston, which suffered 200 mph winds for three hours and a twenty-five foot storm surge. The hurricane remained a mid-sized category 5 hurricane, eventually hitting Cozumel, Mexico, with 175 mph winds and a 20-foot storm surge, killing over 1,900 in the area. The storm system then exited into the Gulf of Mexico as a high-end category 4.

On August 6, the hurricane then intensified into the strongest storm ever recorded, with its 25-mile-wide eyewall (which surrounded a 20-mile-wide eye) packing winds of up to 235 mph. The storm also had the lowest pressure ever recorded, at approximately 833 millibars (24.5 inHg), and it was also massive, with hurricane-force winds extending approximately 135 miles from the eye. On August 7, at 7:15 AM Central Standard time, the storm system then hit Galveston at peak strength with a forward speed of 20 mph, producing a 30-foot storm surge, which increased to over 50 feet as it reached the Houston Ship Channel. The storm's 235-mph winds leveled all but the most resilient of structures, and the winds even damaged the suspension bridge that connected Baytown to La Porte. The port in the Houston Ship Channel was wiped off the map, spewing oil and other chemicals everywhere. The storm caused tremendous damage all over Houston and the surrounding areas.

By the time the storm left the city, the hurricane had left a total of 84,000 dead, many of them from the storm surge. Over $750 billion in damage had been done in the USA, and it is estimated that it will take years for the region to return to normal.

All total, the hurricane had killed 92,000 in the USA and the Caribbean nations, and caused over $650 billion in damage.




Tropical Storm Lesley

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationAugust 4 – August 7
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

Didn't affect land at all.






Hurricane Marcum

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationAugust 10 – August 20
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  925 mbar (hPa)

Hit Bermuda as a Category 4 hurricane, killing over 40 people in the Island nation. Later on hit Ireland as a major extratropical cyclone (with a pressure of 920 millibars and 110 mph winds), killing over 250 in Ireland, many in Dublin. Most died due to the high winds, but many still perished from the major storm surge caused from the storm system.






Hurricane Nick

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationAugust 15 – August 25
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  950 mbar (hPa)

Didn't make landfall anywhere.




Tropical Storm Owen

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationAugust 20 – August 25
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

Didn't make landfall.






Hurricane Ramone

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationAugust 24 – August 29
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Didn't make landfall, but was absorbed by Hurricane Samuel.







Hurricane Samuel

Main article: Hurricane Samuel (2020)
Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Super Hurricane Michael Map 
DurationAugust 22 – September 15
Peak intensity450 mph (720 km/h) (1-min)  550 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Samuel started out as an average tropical depression off the coast of the Cape Verde Islands on August 22. Due to the huge number of storms this season, water temperatures only averaged out at 90*F (32*C). As a result, the tropical cyclone developed into a high-end Category 2, low-end Category 3 hurricane, and stayed that way for four days. After moving at an average speed of 15 mph, the storm then came across warmer waters on August 29, intensifying into a mid-end Category 5 hurricane, and stayed that way as it rampaged through the Windward Islands as a 500-mile-wide storm system, killing over 500 people.

The storm system then quickly intensified into a 200 mph storm, with a pressure of 870 millibars, and sent hurricane-force winds to extend as beyond Cuba and Hispaniola. The hurricane spared Jamaica the full force of the winds, but it then hit Cozulmel as a high-end Category 5 hurricane, killing hundreds. The storm system then crossed into the Gulf of Mexico on September 4, where ocean temperatures averaged at over 95*F (35*C). The hurricane intensified into a MASSIVE storm system, with wind speeds averaging out at 435 mph (705 km/h) and a pressure of 580 millibars in the 40-mile-wide eye, and with hurricane-force winds extending 450 miles from the eye. On September 6, the storm then hit Tampa, Florida with 450 mph (720 km/h) winds and a pressure of 550 millibars, moving at a speed of 15 mph. The storm's massive size and intensity helped to produce an 200-foot storm surge which, combined with the high winds, killed millions in Tampa and the surrounding areas. The storm hit Orlando as a 400 mph (640 km/h) storm, destroying Disneyworld, Downtown Orlando, and many other areas, killing over 100,000 people. After leaving over three million dead in Florida, the storm then exited Florida as a 310 mph (500 km/h) storm with a central pressure of 720 millibars. The storm continued east-northeast, absorbing vast quantities of warm ocean water, which was estimated to have been up to 90*F (32*C) or higher. The storm moved at an average speed of 15 mph, giving time for people to escape, but also escalating the storm's intensification.

Many people, however, were still trapped in the Northeast (thanks, in part, to the damage caused by other storms, and due to the rainbands produced by the super hurricane), and by the time Michael intensified into a 1,500-mile-wide, 400 mph (640 km/h) storm with a pressure below 610 millibars, an eye of 40 miles, and an eyewall of 50 miles, the storm was over 500 miles southeast of the region. The storm's rainbands caused tremendous floods that devastated states as far north as Maine. Hurricane-force winds extended at a diameter of 550 miles, causing Boston to experience average gusts of 110-130 miles per hour and a surge of fifteen feet. The storm then sped up, moving at a speed of 20 mph. It then hit New York directly on Friday, September 11 (at a time of three in the afternoon) as the strongest storm on Earth (or at least, in Atlantic Hurricane history, as Typhoon Noelani hit Japan with similar force on the same day), killing millions in New York, Connecticut, Long Island, Rhode Island, and even Massachusetts. The 400 mile-per-hour winds lasted for over two hours, leaving everything devastated, while a 230-foot (70-meter) storm surge washed over 50 miles inland at up to 20 mph. Areas as far north as Maine suffered rainband-induced floods, and areas as far south as Washington, D.C. had to hunker down because of winds exceeding 75 mph (120 km/h). The storm shattered the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, sending radioactive dust as far south as Maryland and Virginia, and as far west as parts of Pennsylvania. A total of 25,000,000 were estimated to have died in the northeast. The storm system was so strong that it still killed thousands even as far north as Montreal when it hit the city as a 185 mph storm, shattering glass windows, ripping off roofs, and producing enormous floods, while traveling at a forward speed of 40 mph. The storm surge also washed away entire sections of Long Island, causing some parts to be washed away.

By the time the storm system was over, nearly 40,000,000 were directly killed by the storm, many in New York alone. Another 20,000,000 are expected to perish or suffer horrific injuries by the storm and resulting nuclear catastrophe in the area. Damages are expected to exceed over $6 trillion in damage. It is expected to take years before the area could be rebuilt.

Hurricane Terry

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationSeptember 20 – September 30
Peak intensity180 mph (285 km/h) (1-min)  890 mbar (hPa)

The storm hit an already decimated Daytona Beach as a Category 5 hurricane on September 25, killing over 150 in the city and surrounding areas.






Hurricane Vanessa

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationSeptember 22 – September 30
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Didn't affect land.






Hurricane Walter

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationSeptember 30 – October 15
Peak intensity200 mph (325 km/h) (1-min)  870 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Walter was able to reach England as a low-end Category 5 hurricane due to warm waters extending as far north as New York on October 7. Its forward speed, high winds, and enormous size (it was bigger than France and Germany combined) led to high wind damage and a storm surge that decimated London and much of England, killing over 30,000 people in the country and causing over $250 billion in damage.






Tropical Storm Yolanda

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 3 – October 10
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Coexisted with Tropical Storm Zack.






Tropical Storm Zack

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 5 – October 10
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Coexisted with Tropical Storm Yolanda.






Hurricane Alpha

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 10 – October 25
Peak intensity235 mph (380 km/h) (1-min)  800 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Alpha hit Ireland as an even stronger and larger Category 5 hurricane on October 24, with wind speeds of up to 190 mph and a diameter of 900 miles. The storm caused destruction all over Ireland, killing over 20,000 people in Ireland and thousands more in the United Kingdom. The storm system then collided with a cold front that pushed the storm down the North Sea, into the Netherlands, England, and Germany, killing thousands with 160 mph winds and 30-foot storm surge.






Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 20 – October 27
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Hit Dominican Republic, producing rainfall that killed over 100 people.






Tropical Storm Gamma

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 22 – October 30
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Was a weak tropical storm that didn't affect land at all.






Hurricane Delta

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationOctober 27 – November 8
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  933 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Delta stayed as a Category 4 hurricane until it hit Boston as a mid-sized Category 4 hurricane, killing over 2,000 people and causing over $50 billion in damage.






Hurrcane Epsilon

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationNovember 9 – November 17
Peak intensity190 mph (305 km/h) (1-min)  888 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Epsilon first hit just south of Miami, Florida as a low-end Category 5 hurricane, killing over 100 in Miami, Homestead, Florida City, and other areas. After crossing Florida, it swung to the north and intensified into a major hurricane. It then hit New Orleans as a 450-mile-wide, 170-mph storm, killing thousands in the city and causing $150 billion. Since sea levels rose to three feet by the time the hurricane made landfall, the city suffered tremendous flooding from the 30-foot storm surge. The storm's forward speed, which was estimated to have been 15 mph (24 km/h) exasperated the catastrophe. The storm also caused tremendous flooding as far north as Nashville, Tennessee, causing hundreds of casualties in the Midwest.





Hurricane Zeta

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationNovember 17 – November 22
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Zeta stayed out at sea.






Hurricane Eta

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationNovember 20 – November 30
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Eta hit Norfolk as an intense and gigantic Category 2 hurricane, killing dozens in the region and causing billions in damage.






Tropical Depression

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationNovember 28 – December 3
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Didn't affect land at all.






Tropical Storm Theta

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationDecember 1 – December 6
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

Didn't affect land.







Hurricane Iota

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationDecember 6 – December 15
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  910 mbar (hPa)

Iota hit Charleston as a Category 5 storm, killing over 1,000 in the city. It was the strongest Atlantic storm recorded in December.






Hurricane Kappa

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone north 
DurationDecember 15 – December 25
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  918 mbar (hPa)

It hit the city of Wilmington, North Carolina, killing over 50 people and causing over $15 billion in damage. The city was evacuated, though, saving thousands more lives.

This was the last hurricane of the season.

Aftermath

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season left much of the Atlantic Basin in shambles. The oceans, which warmed at an exponential rate, not only generated multiple intense hurricanes, but it also generated more hurricanes than what climate models expected. Some scientists think that this was due to massive changes in the atmosphere, which lowered wind shear and produced more cyclones than expected.

The total ACE of the 2020 Hurricane Season was estimated to be 750, not only breaking the record for the 2005 and 1933 Atlantic Hurricane Seasons, but the season also broke the record for most major storms of any season.

The hurricanes caused economic collapse of the US, England, and other countries. Combined with the destruction of the 2020 Pacific Hurricane Season, 2020 Pacific Typhoon Season, and 2020 Indian Ocean Cyclone Season, the year 2020 became the worst year of natural catastrophe ever recorded.

The storms also devastated many environmental areas by flattening thousands of forests and polluting waterways, destroying much of the biosphere. Hurricane Michael, for example, devastated much of the Eastern Seaboard's biosphere by devastating the Indian Point Nucler Power Plant, spreading radioactive dust across thousands of square miles and contaiminating the areas. It also left a path of destruction large enough to be seen in space.

The storms were also destructive because of the increased sea level rise. Due to global temperatures skyrocketing at an impossibly high rate (especially in the Arctic), ice caps melted at an increased rate, resulting in three feet of sea level rise by the end of the year.

The warming was so intense that, by the time Tropical Cyclone Season began for Australia, several tropical cyclones had already caused problems for the country. Before, due to increased moisture content in the atmosphere, a cold front generated a super blizzard that generated Category 2 hurricane-force winds in Sydney, causing thousands of deaths and injuries.

It is expected that by the end of the decade, up to a quarter of all life on Earth, including half of the human race, will die because of increasingly violent storms, drought, floods, famine, starvation, etc.

See Also

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.