Hypothetical Hurricanes Wiki

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Hypothetical Hurricanes Wiki
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This season is a hyperactive version of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.
It does not necessarily rely on computer models, but there is some sort of imagination and inspiration form Force Thirteen animations. However, there are some invests that never got past disturbance phase that actually did in this season.

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active and one of the costliest Atlantic hurricane season on record. The season also had the highest accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) on record. The season featured a total of 50 (sub)tropical cyclones, all but one of which became a named storm. Of the 50 named storms, 42 developed into hurricanes, and 26 further intensified into major hurricanes, with 11 attaining Category 5 on the Saffir–Simpson scale. It was the 19th and final season to use the Greek letter storm naming system. It is also the first and only season to use the Hebrew letter storm naming system. Of the 50 named storms, 16 of them made landfall in the contiguous United States. The season was also the seventh consecutive season in which at least one Category 5 hurricane formed. Five hurricanes have also reached its minimum pressure below 900 millibars, becoming the season with the most amount of sub-900 mbar storms. This unprecedented activity was fueled by a La Niña that developed in the summer months of 2020.

The season officially started on June 1 and officially ended on November 30. However, storm formation is possible at any time of the year, as demonstrated in 2020 by the early formation of tropical cyclones Astor, Blanche, Cristobal and Diana on May. The first major hurricane, Fay, struck the Caribbean and Eastern Coast. In early July, a series of tropical cyclones formed or moved along the Gulf Stream, calling it "Gulf Stream Race", in which hurricanes Jewel and Paulette reached major hurricane strength. The latter later affected much of New England as a major hurricane. In late July and early August, Hurricanes Sheila and Theodore struck the US as a major hurricane. Hurricane Alpha formed on August 10, making it the earliest in the season to reach the Greek naming system. In late August, Epsilon and Zeta struck Louisiana, in which the latter struck at sub-900 mbar pressure. September was the most active month on record in the Atlantic, with eleven named storms. At that month, eight storms were active at the same time, marking it the most tropical cyclones active at the same time in the Atlantic. Hurricanes Lambda, Mu and Rho moved in the Gulf of Mexico, while Hurricane Pi became the strongest hurricane to strike Spain and France. On early October, Hurricane Tau became the fastest-intensifying hurricane on record, and is also the strongest hurricane in the season. On the last day of October, Hurricane Psi formed and made landfall in Central America at Category 5 strength, then it later affected much of Cuba and Florida then reintensifying again to a Category 5 before striking New England, causing massive damages. Later, Hurricane Alef became the first Hebrew-named storm on record after exhausting the Greek names. Afterwards, Hurricane Bet actually set the record for the fastest-intensifying hurricane within six hours, jumping from Category 2 to Category 5 instantly. After the hurricane season ended in November 30, several more storms formed, before being ended by Hurricane He, a year-crossing storm.

Timeline

2020 WMHB Farm.png

2020_Atlantic_What_Might_Have_Been_Hurricane_Season_(Farm_River)

2020 Atlantic What Might Have Been Hurricane Season (Farm River)

The animated version of this season!

Systems

Storms
TS Astor
C2 Blanche
C1 Cristobal
TS Diana
C2 Elvis
C4
Fran
C2
Gustav
TS
Hailey
C1 Ike
C3
Jewel
C1
Klaus
C1
Laura
TS
Marcel
TS
Nova
TS
Odion
C3
Paulette
C4 Ralph
C4
Sheila
C5
Theodore
TS
Vicky
C2
Warren
C4
Alpha
C2
Beta
C1
Gamma
TS Delta
C4
Epsilon
C5
Zeta
C3
Eta
C2
Theta
C4
Kappa
C5
Iota
C2
Mu
C5 Mu
C5
Nu
C2
Xi
C5
Omicron
C3
Pi
C5
Rho
C4
Sigma
C5
Tau
C4 Upsilon
C4
Phi
C4
Chi
C5
Psi
C3
Omega
C5
Alef
C5
Bet
C1
Gimel
C3 Dalet
C1
He

Tropical Storm Astor

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dorian 2019-08-28 1620Z.jpg Astor-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationMarch 12 – March 17
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  993 mbar (hPa)

A non-tropical low pressure area was spotted in the Caribbean on March 10. It started to rapidly organize, and by March 11, it had developed a central CDO and a nice burst of convection. By the next day, it developed to a tropical depression. Two days later, it strengthened to Tropical Storm Astor, making it one of the most unusual March tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. It moved northeastward, passing over the Lesser Antilles while gaining some convection. Eventually, it started to slow down and head northward after reaching its peak intensity of 60 mph with a minimal pressure of 993 mbar, making it one of the strongest March tropical cyclones on record. It moved northward and started to lose tropical characteristics. By March 16, NHC had noticed that Astor had gained subtropical characteristics, becoming a subtropical storm. It further weakened to a subtropical depression before degenerating to a remnant low on March 17. Astor caused relatively little damages.

Hurricane Blanche

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Dorian 2019-09-02 1535Z.jpg Blanche-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationMay 16 – May 23
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  971 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Depression Two of the 2020 season developed around Cuba on May 16. Eighteen hours later, an Air Force reconnaissance aircraft found that it had attained tropical storm strength while moving northeast. Tropical Storm Blanche weaved along the Gulf Stream and changed little in intensity as it encountered increasing wind shear, but it sharply decreased after moving towards Bahamas, making it a Category 1 hurricane and further reached Category 2 strength. While passing east of Florida, the system reached peak winds of 105 mph (165 km/h) and minimum pressure of 971 millibars. Blanche accelerated northeast and has started to weaken due to increasing wind shear. It further weakened to a tropical storm and eventually interacted with another front and became an extratropical cyclone by 12:00 UTC on May 23. The low turned east before dissipating near Azores a day later. Blanche caused $75 million datalities and killed five people.

Hurricane Cristobal

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Bob 1985-07-24 2000Z.png Cristobal-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationMay 22 – May 28
Peak intensity75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

On May 24, a small, well-defined low with centralized convection developed over the Caribbean Sea. The system hanged on for a while before being classified as a tropical depression few hours later. The system moved northward and reached tropical storm strength before striking Cuba. It passed the Bahamas islands, gaining significant organization and it eventually reached Category 1 strength. The system attained peak winds of 75 mph (120 km/h) shortly before moving inland near Isle of Palms. Turning north and accelerating, the system quickly degraded and transitioned into an extratropical cyclone over Virginia. The hurricane caused extensive damage, reaching up to $345 million and it killed 12 people.

Tropical Storm Diana

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Henri 2015-09-10 1425Z.png Diana-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationMay 29 – June 1
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

On May 26, the NHC monitored an area of low pressure over the Central Atlantic. Eventually, it started to organize slowly despite low chances of development. Eventually, a new tropical depression had formed on May 29 and it strengthened into Tropical Storm Diana 12 hours later. Diana remained fairly weak and disorganized due to high wind shear but it managed to reach peak winds of 60 mph (95 km/hr) before moving westward to an area with stronger wind shear and eventually disintegrating. On June 1, it had effectively dissipated.

Hurricane Elvis

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
WINIFRED SIM 1992.png Elvis-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 1 – June 8
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  964 mbar (hPa)

At 10:00 UTC on May 31, Tropical Storm [REDACTED] of the Eastern Pacific basin made landfall on Guatemala and dissipated inland. Its remnants crossed Central America and entered the Bay of Campeche, and on June 1, Tropical Depression Five developed directly from those remnants. By 12:00 UTC the following day, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Elvis. Elvis made landfall as a strong tropical storm on Mexico at 20:00 UTC on June 2 at its peak intensity of 45 mph (75 km/h). It weakened eventually to a tropical depression as it emerged towards the Eastern Pacific. Elvis continued its journey strengthening in the Pacific and further reached hurricane strength. Elvis further reached peak winds of 110 mph (175 km/hr) before making landfall in Mexico on June 7, and it eventually fully disintegrated.

Hurricane Fran

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Fran-2020 Farm.jpg Fran-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 2 – June 11
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  931 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave has been spotted in the Caribbean on May 31. It has moved westward and has passed over Colombia, where it gained some organization. Eventually, the tropical wave significantly developed and it organized to become a tropical depression on June 2. Fran moved westward and it strengthened to Tropical Storm Fran a day later. Fran sharply turned eastward due to the influence of high pressure area and it started to eventually gain further organization, in which it strengthened to a hurricane on June 5 and further to a major hurricane one day later while approaching Jamaica. Eventually, Fran moved northwestward and it avoided landfall, allowing it to intensify to a Category 4 hurricane by the next day. Fran reached its peak intensity of 150 mph (240 km/hr) before directly striking Cuba at peak intensity. Due to land interaction, Fran weakened down to a Category 2 hurricane and began accelerating northward. It passed the Bahamas islands and favorable conditions allowed it to strengthen back to a major hurricane. It cruised off the coast of North Carolina but cooler waters weakened Fran. It eventually struck Long Island as a category 1 hurricane before turning extratropical on June 11. Fran caused extensive damage across Cuba and the East Coast of the United States, reaching up to $27.8 billion and killing 77.

Hurricane Gustav

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Delta 2020-10-09 1800Z.png Gustav-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 4 – June 10
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

On June 2, the NHC began to monitor a tropical wave located in Caribbean Sea. Later, at 21:00 UTC on June 4, the system was classified as Potential Tropical Cyclone Seven as it moved northward. Eventually, it became a tropical depression and it was classified as Tropical Storm Gustav on June 5. Gustav moved northward and started to gradually intensify. It moved east of the Yucatán and emerged towards the Gulf of Mexico. Gustav hanged on for a while before intensifying to a Category 1 hurricane on June 7. It gained Category 2 status a day later and reached its peak intensity of 105 mph (165 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 966 millibars. It moved toward the southwestern Louisiana coast, and made landfall near Creole, Louisiana with winds of 105 mph (165 km/h) at 23:00 UTC. By June 9, Gustav had weakened to a tropical storm and few hours later to a tropical depression. It became post-tropical on June 10 and got absorbed by a frontal system. It caused $2.3 billion worth of damages as it affected much of Louisiana and Texas and it killed 11 people.

Tropical Storm Hailey

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Chantal 2007-07-31 1710Z.jpg Hailey-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 25 – June 28
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)

On June 23, the NHC began to track an area of low pressure located over eastern North Carolina. As it moved over the Gulf Stream, warm water temperatures in the Atlantic allowed the system to rapidly organize, on June 25, the NHC designated the system as a tropical depression, and Tropical Storm Hailey a day later. The storm proceeded to move quickly east-northeastward along the Gulf Stream, and reaching its peak intensity with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 1002 mb (29.53 inHg) on June 27. Hailey moved east of Newfoundland and it eventually turned extratropical on June 28 and it got absorbed by a larger extratropical cyclone. Hailey is the first of many storms that occur during the "Gulf Stream Rush" where a lot of storms cruised the Gulf Stream in a short period of time.

Hurricane Ike

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Georges 1980-09-08 1200Z.png Ike-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 28 – July 1
Peak intensity75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

A tropical low is monitored northeast of Bahamas and it immediately started to develop significantly while moving northeastward. It eventually encountered favorable environmental conditions and it was designated as Tropical Storm Ike by June 28 as it possessed tropical storm winds analyzed by hurricane hunters. Ike is the second storm in the so-called "Gulf Stream Rush" as it moved towards the Gulf Stream. Ike started to organize and it reached Category 1 strength. However, Ike lost tropical storm characteristics and was declared an extratropical cyclone on July 1.

Hurricane Jewel

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Jewel 2020 Farm.jpg Jewel-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJune 30 – July 12
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  947 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave has been observed by Hurricane Hunters oas early as June 25 cruising towards the Caribbean, It started to organize rapidly and hurricane hunters have detected significant convection along the center. By June 30, it had developed to a tropical depression. A day later, it further strengthened to Tropical Storm Jewel. On July 1, Jewel started to intensify steadily in the favorable waters of the Western Caribbean. Eventually, it reached Category 1 strength as hurricane hunters have seen signs of an eye and higher findings from their dropsondes. Jewel crossed just east of the Yucatán Peninsula and emerged towards the Gulf of Mexico. It started to intensify rapidly, reaching Category 2 strength on July 3. Jewel further strengthened to a major hurricane a day later, reaching its peak winds of 125 mph (205 km/hr) and reaching minimum pressure of 947 millibars. However, vertical wind shear halted Jewel's intensification, and it started to steadily weakened while heading towards the Gulf Coast. By July 5, Jewel had weakened down to a Category 2 cyclone. By the next day, it struck western Louisiana as a weakening hurricane and it eventually weakened down to a tropical storm.

However, it didn't deteriorate due to brown ocean effect, as it continued to show signs of convection after days overland. It moved eastwards across the Continental United States while maintainin its strength overland. By July 8, Jewel had managed to emerge towards the Atlantic and had strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane back again. Jewel then joined the "Gulf Stream Rush" and it started to intensify again due to favorable environmental conditions. It reached Category 2 strength again on July 9 as it moves north of Bermuda. Jewel reached major hurricane strength yet again, reaching its secondary peak strength of 115 mph (185 km/hr) with minimum pressure of 961 millibars. Jewel then weakened again as it started to race towards the Gulf Stream. It passed east of the Newfoundland and raced towards Greenland. However, by July 12, Jewel had managed to become the second northernmost Atlantic hurricane just behind Ingrid last year. It turned extratropical that day and it managed to reach Greenland before being absorbed by a massive extratropical cyclone. It caused heavy damages of $887 million across the United States and Canada but it only killed four people.

Hurricane Klaus

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Paulette 2020-10-14 1115Z.png Klaus-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 2 – July 5
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  982 mbar (hPa)

Around June 30, a low pressure area developed just north of the Bahamas after part of a tropical wave and an upper-level trough interacted. The disturbance moved northward and started to develop rapidly. Shortly thereafter, the low became a tropical storm named Klaus on July 2. Klaus then joined the "Gulf Stream Rush" afterwards. Mid-level wind shear resulted in slow intensification for a while. Klaus eventually organized and reached hurricane strength on July 4. Klaus reached its peak intensity of 85 mph (140 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 982 millibars. Klaus started to rapidly transition to an extratropical and it eventually transitioned on July 5. It got absorbed by a larger extratropical cyclone.

Hurricane Laura

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Paulette 2020-09-13 1710Z.jpg Laura-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 3 – July 6
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  983 mbar (hPa)

Another wave of tropical low has developed around the Gulf Stream, joining the "Gulf Stream Race" on July 1. The low rapidly organized and it became Tropical Storm Laura on July 3. Laura took a slightly different approach where it started to move eastward. It eventually started to organize rapidly and reached hurricane strength on July 5 but it didn't manage to last long due to increasing wind shear. Laura reached its peak intensity of 80 mph (130 km/hr) and reaching minimum pressure of 983 millibars. Laura moved eastward and it eventually rapidly degenerated to a remnant low on July 6.

Tropical Storm Marcel

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dolly 2020-06-23 1800Z.png Marcel-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 4 – July 6
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

On July 3, an area of convection has developed and it emerged towards the Gulf Stream, joining the "Gulf Stream Race". The system has developed little for a while due to marginable conditions. The next day, it eventually rapidly organized and developed into Tropical Storm Marcel. Marcel further intensified as it began its extratropical transition, reaching peak intensity of 995 mbar and maximum sustained winds of 60 mph (95 km/h) by the next day. Marcel further raced towards the Atlantic before turning extratropical on July 6, before being absrobed by a much larger extratropical cyclone afterwards.

Tropical Storm Nova

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Paulette 2020-09-12 1445Z.jpg Nova-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 4 – July 7
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

On July 1, a cluster of thunderstorms was spotted off the coast of Georgia and slowly moved northwestward. The NHC began monitoring the system which had become a tropical low on July 3. The circulation of the low became better defined and closed after passing north of Bermuda, the system was upgraded to Tropical Storm Nova. Nova further intensified as it began its extratropical transition, reaching peak intensity of 998 mbar and maximum sustained winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) at 18:00 UTC that same day. Three hours later, it became extratropical as it became part of the "Gulf Stream Race" before being absorbed by Laura.

Tropical Storm Odion

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dorian 2019-09-07 1730Z.jpg Odion-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 5 – July 10
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

A cluster of thunderstorms was spotted off the coast of Florida on July 2. It emerged towards the Gulf Stream, yet joining the "Gulf Stream Race" as its eighth storm. It eventually started to rapidly organize and by July 5, the NHC designated it as Tropical Depression Fifteen. By July 17, it was upgraded to Tropical Storm Odion. Odion steadily strengthened while moving northeastward, and it managed to organize fairly well. Odion reached its peak intensity of 990 mbar while having its peak winds of 70 mph (110 km/hr) while starting to undergo extratropical transition. By July 9, Odion passed over the most corner of Newfoundland and it eventually turned extratropical several hours later.

Hurricane Paulette

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Paulette 2020 Farm.jpg Paulette-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 6 – July 12
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

On July 6, an area of disorganized cloudiness and showers in relation to a nearly stationary surface trough in the Gulf of Mexico was spotted. Deep convection rapidly blossomed over the Gulf of Mexico. By July 7 at 00:00 UTC, it was designated as Tropical Storm Paulette. Paulette meandered across the Gulf Stream, joining the Gulf Stream Race and the last storm to do so. It also had a strict Fujiwara effect with Jewel around that time when Paulette was strengthening. It eventually strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane on July 9 at 00:00 UTC. Paulette started to strengthen across the Gulf Stream, reaching Category 2 strength by 12:00 UTC. It further strengthened to a Category 3 hurricane six hours later as it approaches New England. It reached its peak intensity of 120 mph (195 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 953 millibars. Paulette struck New Jersey at Category 3 strength on July 10 by 12:00 UTC, weakening it but not rapidly. It had a slow transition to an extratropical cyclone. It weakened to a Category 2 on January 11 at 00:00 UTC and to a Category 1 six hours later. It still managed to hold on its tropical nature until July 12 by 09:00 UTC while remaining a minor hurricane over Canada. It even managed to strengthen further to a Category 2-strength extratropical cyclone before diminishing few hours later. It caused $21.6 billion worth of damages and killed 56 people, mostly in New England.

Hurricane Ralph

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Ike 2008-09-04 0645Z.jpg Ralph-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 16 – July 29
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  926 mbar (hPa)

A dry, thermal low-pressure area merged with a tropical wave just offshore the west coast of Africa on July 15. This low pressure area started to rapidly organize and a tropical depression formed on July 16 at 06:00 UTC. It further strengthened to Tropical Storm Ralph at 06:00 UTC the next day. Ralph meandered across the Main Development Region and it started to organize. By the next day, it strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. It had udnergone an explosive intensification and it intensified to a Category 4 on July 19 at 06:00 UTC. It reached its initial peak intensity of 155 mph (250 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 926 millibars, shy of category 5 strength. It managed to maintain its category for some more time before eventually weakening on July 21 due to increasing wind shear as it moves northwestward. It further weakened to a Category 1 the next day while passing east of the Lesser Antilles. However, it started to strengthen again and it managed to regain its major hurricane strength at 18:00 UTC of the same day and eventually Category 4 strength the next day. It fluctuated in strength and it reached its secondary peak intensity on July 25 at 09:00 UTC of 145 mph (230 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 941 millibars. By July 26, Ralph weakened due to cooler sea surface temperatures while passing east of the US coast. It weakened to a Category 1 hurricane on July 27 at 00:00 UTC and made landfall as a tropical storm over Canada just a few hours later. It transitioned to an extratropical cyclone shortly afterwards and it was absorbed by a larger extratropical cyclone on July 29. Generally, it caused minimal damages and some swells across the Atlantic coastline.

Hurricane Sheila

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Bret of 1999.JPG Sheila-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 21 – July 28
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  938 mbar (hPa)

On July 10, a tropical wave was spotted off the coast of Africa. Dry air caused the system to be mostly free of showers and thunderstorms by the time it reached the Lesser Antilles on July 16. Thereafter, After the wave reached near Cuba, upper-level winds became more favorable. The system acquired a well-defined circulation, and a tropical depression formed at 00:00 UTC on July 21 just north of Cuba. Light to moderate wind shear and warm seas but mid-level dry air caused the depression to slowly strengthen, becoming Tropical Storm Sheila about 18 hours after forming. Later on July 23, Sheila began intensifying slightly faster as convective banding increased and an eye feature developed. By 18:00 UTC at the same day, Sheila intensified to a Category 1 hurricane. By the next day, Sheila reached major hurricane strength and eventually to a Category 4 hurricane on July 25 at 00:00 UTC. Sheila managed to reach its peak intensity of 150 mph and minimum pressure of 938 millibars. Sheila slightly weakened before making landfall on 15:00 UTC the same day. The system rapidly weakened after moving inland, dropping to tropical depression status at 12:00 UTC on July 26 and then dissipating shortly afterwards. The cyclone caused four deaths in Mexico and approximately $7.8 billion in damage and 26 deaths.

Hurricane Theodore

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Theodore 2020 Farm.jpg Theodore-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 25 – August 5
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  917 mbar (hPa)

The National Hurricane Center first began tracking a vigorous tropical wave off the coast of Africa on July 23. The wave gradually organized and became better defined, developing a broad area of low pressure. The system moved westward towards the Greater Antilles and convection eventually flared up enough for it to become designated as a tropical depression on July 25 at 12:00 UTC. The depression hasn't organized much for some while until it strengthened to Tropical Storm Theodore on July 27 at 00:00 UTC. Theodore moved across the MDR and it started to strengthen as it approached the Greater Antilles. By 15:00 UTC on July 28, Theodore strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. Shortly afterwrads, it made landfall and passed north of Puerto Rico. Theodore further strengthened to a major hurricane on July 30 at 21:00 UTC and further to a Category 4 hurricane in which it managed to peak with 1-minute winds of 230 km/hr (145 mph) and minimum pressure of 941 millibars. Theodore passed over the Bahamas islands as it slowly weakens due to worsening environmental conditions.

It reached Florida but started to move northward. Theodore managed to quickly regain Category 4 strength on August 2 at 18:00 UTC. It suddenly reached Category 5 strength on August 3 at 06:00 UTC. Few hours later, it reached its peak winds of 160 mph (260 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 917 millibars. On the same day at 18:00 UTC it sturck North Carolina at peak intensity, becoming one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the state. It weakened to a Category 3 hurricane shortly afterwards and further down to a Category 1 on August 4 at 06:00 UTC. It further weakened to a tropical storm where it struck New York on the same day at 18:00 UTC. It struck New Brunswick at similar strength, at it turned extratropical cyclone on August 5 at 21:00 UTC, and subsequently weakening progressing into Quebec. Damage estimates exceeded US$72 billion, making Isaias the costliest tropical cyclone to strike the Northeastern U.S. since Hurricane Ingrid in 2019, and it killed over 103 people.

Tropical Storm Vicky

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Karl 2016-09-19.png Vicky-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationJuly 30 – August 8
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

On July 28, a tropical wave emerged off the west coast of Africa. Slow-moving, the system soon developed a defined low on July 29 as it turned north along the east side of an upper-level low. Associated convection became sufficiently organized for the system to be classified as a tropical depression the following day. By August 1, the tropical depression had strengthened to Tropical Storm Vicky. Initially, Vicky struggled with wind shear halting any intensification, and eventually it weakened back to a tropical depression on August 3 at 03:00 UTC. Vicky eventually moved northeastward and regained tropical storm strength. It reached its peak intensity with winds of 35 mph (55 km/h) and a pressure of 1008 mbar around 03:00 UTC on August 5. A combination of decreasing sea surface temperatures and dry air caused convection to weaken further. However, Vicky eventually turned extratropical on August 6 at 00:00 UTC and dissipating a few hours.

Hurricane Warren

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Epsilon 2020-10-22 1635Z.jpg Warren-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 3 – August 12
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  962 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave was spotted in the Main Development Region on July 31. This tropical wave moved westward with little development. On August 2, the wave started to develop organization. ASCAT pass had shown significant convection with its center while it approached Lesser Antilles. As a result, a new tropical depression was designated on August 3 at 12:00 UTC. The depression moved northwestward with little development, but on August 6 at 00:00 UTC, the NHC upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Warren. Warren moved northward across the Gulf Stream and it managed to maintain its intensity for a long while. Warren moved west of Bermuda and it started to move northeastward. Warren eventually rapidly organized and reached Category 1 strength on August 9 at 18:00 UTC. Twelve hours later, Warren strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane. Warren reached its peak intensity of 110 mph (175 km/hr) with minimum pressure of 962 millibars. Warren eventually started to transition to an extratropical cyclone as it weakens while moving northeast. On August 12 at 15:00 UTC, Warren had officially transitioned to an extratropical cyclone and was absorbed shortly afterwards.

Hurricane Alpha

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Florence 2018-09-11 0215Z.jpg GREEK1-Alpha-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 10 – August 19
Peak intensity140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min)  943 mbar (hPa)

On August 5, the NHC began monitoring a tropical wave over the tropical Atlantic. Shower and thunderstorm activity on the wave axis increased, although the low-level circulation remained elongated and poorly-organized. The wave's circulation then became defined and a low-pressure system with disorganized convection formed late on August 10. On the same day, the NHC designated it as a tropical depression. The shear relaxed some, allowing convection to begin to form closer to the estimated center of the depression. This allowed it to strengthen into Tropical Storm Alpha at 12:00 UTC on August 11, the first Greek named storm. Alpha began to swiftly strengthen, reaching hurricane strength on August 13 at 12:00 UTC. Alpha stalled for a while, battling with some wind shear which disrupted its structure for a bit. On August 15, the shear relaxed, allowing it to strengthen to a Category 2 hurricane. It moved northward as it strengthen further. Alpha reached Category 4 strength on August 16 at 12:00 UTC and it reached its peak intensity of 140 mph (220 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 943 millibars. Alpha moved northeastward passign east of Bermuda. However, it started to weaken sharply due to decreasing sea surface temperatures and it has turned extratropical on August 18 before being absorbed a day later.

Hurricane Beta

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Lee 2017-09-27 1349Z.jpg GREEK2-Beta-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 12 – August 18
Peak intensity100 mph (155 km/h) (1-min)  973 mbar (hPa)

A small mid-level circulation formed and some thunderstorm activity developed that night while it moved slowly northeastward off the coast of South Carolina on AUgust 10. The system became better organized the next day, although it lacked a well-defined center and banding features. The low then moved and deep convection increased as most of the circulation was over the warm water temperatures in the Atlantic. This caused the low to become better defined and acquire gale-forced winds and at 00:00 UTC on August 13, the system became Tropical Storm Beta. Beta moved southeast and it started to organize fairly well. Wind shear dropped significantly which allowed the system to generally strengthen within the following days. On August 15 at 12:00 UTC, Beta strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane while accelerating northeastward across the Gulf Stream. On August 17 at 00:00 UTC, Beta strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane and reached its peak intensity of 100 mph (155 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 973 millibars. Increasing shear and interaction with a stationary front took its toll on Beta and it began to quickly weaken as its circulation began to become elongated. Beta became an extratropical cyclone when it embedded itself within the front at 18:00 UTC August 18.

Hurricane Gamma

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Chris Jun 21 2012 1330Z.jpg GREEK3-Gamma-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 13 – August 16
Peak intensity75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Another low pressure area was spotted off the coast of Western Florida on AUgust 12. The low pressure area eventually started to develop low-level circulation as it moved northeastward. Low wind shear and high surface temperatures allowed the system to organize, and it was designated as Tropical Storm Gamma on August 12 at 18:00 UTC. Gamma took the Gulf Stream path, the same thing as Beta did and it started to gradually intensify. Gamma eventually reached hurricane strength on August 16 at 18:00 UTC. It reached its peak intensity of 75 mph (120 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 985 millibars. Gamma moved off the coast of Newfoundland as it began its extartropical transition. By August 17, it had weakened down to a tropical storm and few hours later, it had transitioned to an extratropical cyclone.

Tropical Storm Delta

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Imelda 2019-09-18 1715Z.jpg GREEK4-Delta-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 14 – August 16
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

A new tropical system developed in the Bay of Campeche on August 11. It moved northward, gradually organizing and forming a low-level circulation. Convection started to rapidly increase as it approaches Texas. By August 14, the NHC upgraded the system to a tropical depression. Few hours later, it had strengthened to Tropical Storm Delta. Delta had strengthened for a bit but it remained a weak tropical storm before striking Texas with winds of 40 mph (65 km/hr) on August 15, weakening to a tropical depression and finally degenerating to a remnant low on August 16.

Hurricane Epsilon

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Laura 2020 Image (MG V2).png GREEK5-Epsilon-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 18 – August 28
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  931 mbar (hPa)

The NHC began to track a tropical wave located over the central tropical Atlantic at 00:00 UTC on August 14. The wave eventually developed a low-level circulation as it enters the Caribbean Sea. Eventually, at 06:00 UTC on August 17, the NHC designated the wave to a tropical depression. Intensification was initially slow, but the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Epsilon at 12:00 UTC on August 18. Epsilon moved westward in the Caribbean, gradually organizing until finally reaching Category 1 strength on August 20 at 06:00 UTC. One day later, it further strengthened and reached Category 2 strength. Epsilon passed east of the Yucatán Peninsula, further strengthening to a Category 3 hurricane the next day and further to a Category 4 hurricane few hours later. And then, at 15:00 UTC on August 23, Epsilon reached its peak intensity with 1-minute sustained winds at 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 931 mbar. Epsilon was weakened slightly by steering flow from rapidly deepening Zeta to the east, and it made landfall over Louisiana at 03:00 UTC on August 24 with winds of 140 mph. Epsilon steadily weakened after moving inland, dropping to tropical storm strength roughly 12 hours later over Northern Louisiana, and then to a tropical depression over Arkansas early on August 25. The deteriorating system turned nortwestward, and by 12:00 UTC on August 25, degenerated into a remnant low. Epsilon caused extreme damages, causing around $63 billion and killing 104 people.

Hurricane Zeta

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Zeta 2020-Farm.jpg GREEK6-Zeta-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 15 – August 30
Peak intensity220 mph (350 km/h) (1-min)  860 mbar (hPa)

On August 13, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) began tracking a large tropical wave that had emerged off the West African coast, and was traversing across the Intertropical Convergence Zone. As the system moved across the tropical Atlantic, satellite imagery revealed that the system had developed a well-defined center of circulation with sufficient organized deep convection to be classified as a tropical depression at 15:00 UTC on August 15. Development was very slow afterwards, in which the depression continued to stagnate and remain disorganized for the following four days. On August 19 at 18:05 UTC, NOAA Hurricane Hunter Aircraft found that the depression had strengthened and become Tropical Storm Zeta. Zeta started to rapidly strengthen due to favorable environmental conditions and decreasing wind shear. It rapidly strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane the following dat at 06:00 UTC as it nears the Windward Islands. Zeta was originally forecast to cross over the Caribbean Islands, but Zeta took a sharp turn northwestward which allowed it to strengthen further and avoid landfall. Zeta further strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane and to a Category 4 on August 22 at 06:00 UTC. As it approaches the Bahamas, the environmental conditions continue to be extremely favorable for Zeta, which allowed it to strengthen to a Category 5 hurricane at 18:00 UTC the same day. Zeta remained a small but its structure started to become more compact.

Zeta continued to deepen further while crossing the Straits of Florida. By August 23 at 18:00 UTC, Zeta had reached winds of 180 mph (285 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 912 millibars. Once entering the Gulf of Mexico, Zeta started to explosively deepen, this is due to Gulf of Mexico being unusually extremely hot and the outflow from Epsilon allowed conditions to be extremely favorable. For a few days, Zeta was deepening slowly, reaching sub-900 mbar on August 24 and 894 millibars on August 25. Zeta also continued to remain fairly small while approaching the US Gulf Coast. By the next day, Zeta suddenly explosively deepened, reaching its peak intensity of 220 mph (350 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 860 millibars, becoming one of the strongest hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico. Zeta eventually struck Western Louisiana with same winds and slightly lower pressure of 867 millibars, becoming the most intense hurricane to strike Louisiana until Hurricane Tau few months later. Unlike most storms, Zeta didn't experience a period of rapid weakening due to its extremely intense and compact eyewall. It took 18 hours for Zeta to weaken down to a Category 4 hurricane, and another 18 more hours just to bring Zeta down below major hurricane strength. Eventually, as it weakens further, Zeta started to expand rapidly as it loses tropical characteristics. By August 30, Zeta had transitioned to an extratropical cyclone but maintaining its hurricane-force winds. Zeta even managed to regain major hurricane-force winds as an extratropical cyclone before being absorbed few hours later. Zeta hit a sparsely populated region of Louisiana and due to its small size, it didn't cause damages that reach up to trillions. It caused roughly $145 billion and 86 fatalities, primarily due to Epsilon's first wrath of effects and a huge chunk of damage is within Midwest and parts of Canada.

Hurricane Eta

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Iris 2001-10-08 1525Z.png GREEK7-Eta-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 29 – September 4
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  962 mbar (hPa)

On August 26, the NHC began to monitor a tropical wave that was moving westward over the Atlantic. Over the next four days, system gradually organized and acquired gale-force winds and at 06:00 UTC on August 29, it developed into a tropical depression. It was later upgraded to a tropical storm at 00:00 UTC on August 30, when a hurricane hunter aircraft investigating the storm found a well-defined low-level circulation (LLC), allowing the NHC to name the system Eta. Afterwards, moderate northerly shear of 15 knots halted the trend and partially exposed the center of circulation, although its pressure continued to drop. Eventually, it would continue to intensify further, reaching hurricane strength on August 31 at 15:00 UTC. Eta strengthened swifty within the following hours due to decreasing wind shear and SST warming trend. It moved southwestward and reached major hurricane strength on September 1 at 12:00 UTC, and it reached its peak intensity with 1-minute sustained winds of 115 mph (185 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 962 mbars. Three hours later, Eta made landfall in Belize at peak intensity. Nana quickly weakened, falling to a tropical depression the next day. It crossed into the Eastern Pacific and managed to regain strength for some more time before degenerating into a remnant low again at 03:00 UTC on September 4, dissipating shortly thereafter. Total economic losses exceeded $4 billion and 75 people were killed.

Hurricane Theta

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Humberto 2019-08-16 1315Z.jpg GREEK8-Theta-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationAugust 30 – September 6
Peak intensity100 mph (155 km/h) (1-min)  976 mbar (hPa)

A vigorous mid to upper-level shortwave trough moved into the Southeastern United States on August 28. The shortwave trough then interacted with the remnants of a frontal system, resulting in the formation of a low-pressure area offshore northeast Florida on August 39. The low quickly organized into a tropical depression around 12:00 UTC on August 30 while drifting along the Gulf Stream. Dry air and vertical wind shear offset the warm sea surface temperatures as the system headed northeastward. However, following a burst in deep convection, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Theta on August 31 at 00:00 UTC. Theta moved northeast and it started to rapidly organize due to decreasing wind shear. Hurricane hunters found hurricane-force winds which allowed to upgrade Theta to a Category 1 on September 1 at 12:00 UTC. Theta strengthened slowly, but it managed to reach Category 2 strength on September 3 at 00:00 UTC. It reached its peak winds of 100 mph (155 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 976 mbar. Eventually, Theta started to weaken and lose tropical characteristics as it approach northeastward. It transitioned to an extratropical cyclone on September 5 and was absorbed by a cold front eventually.

Hurricane Kappa

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Iota-2020 Farm.jpg GREEK9-Iota-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 5 – October 16
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  924 mbar (hPa)

The NHC began to track a tropical wave located over Africa on August 30. The wave became better organized and formed an area of low pressure on September 4, while south of Cape Verde, but convective activity remained disorganized. In the early hours of September 5, the wave became more organized, and the NHC began issuing advisories for the tropical depression at 21:00 UTC on September 5. At 15:00 UTC on September 7, the NHC upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Kappa. The storm moved generally west-northwestward over the central tropical Atlantic as it gradually intensified. On September 9, wind shear briefly increased which hampered intensification a bit but it started to strengthen once more. It reached Category 1 two days later at 00:00 UTC, after Hurricane Hunters have found sufficient organization and eye development. Kappa strengthened some more, reaching Category 2 strength on September 11 at 18:00 UTC. It initially leveled off but it eventually reached its first peak intensity with 1-minute sustained winds of 110 mph (175 km/h) with a minimum central pressure of 965 mbar. Several days later, increasing wind shear had weakened the storm. On September 14 at 09:00 UTC, Kappa was weakened down to a Category 1 hurricane as it approaches the Gulf Stream. On September 15, despite a very harsh environment, Kappa began to re-intensify. The shear later began to lessen, allowing Kappa to become more organized and begin to form a clearer eye, becoming a Category 2 hurricane again at 12:00 UTC on September 15. Dry air entrainment gave the storm a somewhat ragged appearance, but it continued to slowly strengthen as it approached Bermuda with its eye clearing out and its convection becoming more symmetric. Kappa then made a sharp turn to the northeast and reached major hurricane strength on September 17 at 09:00 UTC.

On September 18 at 12:00 UTC, Kappa reached Category 4 strength while moving northeastward, reaching its peak intensify of 155 mph (250 km/h) and a pressure of 924 mbar later that day. It maintained its strength within the next day as the waters started to cool down. By September 20, Kappa had weakened down to a Category 3 hurricane. It then gradually weakened over the course of the following days but Kappa does not show any signs of extratropical transition, which is very unusual for a tropical cyclone like Kappa. By September 23, Kappa had weakened down to a Category 1 hurricane and is starting to move southwards. By 18:00 UTC of the same day, Kappa had weakened down to a tropical storm and has seemed to begin extratropical transition while between Azores and Mainland Europe. By September 26, Kappa turned extratropical but is continuing to gain strength. In fact, Kappa has enlarged a lot but has kept its structure and it is expected to turn tropical again within the following days. Kappa regained hurricane strength later that day while maintaining its extratropical structure. It also enlarged massively, with its outflow stretching from Galicia to Azores. By the next day, Kappa, while still extratropical, had reached windspeeds similar to a Category 3 major hurricane. By September 28 at 18:00 UTC, Kappa successfully transitioned back to a tropical cyclone, with 1-minute winds reaching up to 120 mph (195 km/hr) and minimum pressure droppin to 938 mbar. Environmental conditions in the area are also quite favorable, which allowed Kappa to restrengthen to a Category 4 hurricane the next day. It reached its secondary peak intensity of 140 mph (220 km/hr) and a very low minimum pressure of 927 mbar. However, it weakened back to a Category 3 again the next day due to increasing wind shear, and down to a Category 2 in which it leveled off for several hours. Kappa maintained its large size while maintaining hurricane strength.

On October 2 at 03:00 UTC, Kappa weakened down to a Category 1 hurricane, but the environmental conditions started to be unusually favorable again, which promotes strengthening. Few hours later, Kappa regained back Category 2 strength, and started to accelerate northwestward again. On October 3 at 06:00 UTC, Kappa reached major hurricane strength, and by the next day, back to a Category 4 again while passing north of Azores. Kappa reached its third peak intensity at 140 mph (220 km/hr) and a slightly higher pressure of 933 millibars before growing extremely large, stretching from Ireland to Morocco. It moved southwest again and much of the convection only affected Azores, despite Kappa reaching very close to Portugal. Kappa weakened again and has shown signs of extratropical transition again. On October 7 at 12:00 UTC, Kappa transitioned to an extratropical cyclone for the second time while maintaining hurricane strength. It moved westward and its winds weakened to a strength similar to a tropical storm and its size has mostly shrunk, but its convection remained intact and continued to meander across the North Atlantic for several days. On October 10 at 18:00 UTC, Kappa become tropical again, and has started to gradually intensify in the middle subtropical region due to marginally favorable conditions. By the next day, Kappa reached Category 1 strength but it has struggled to intensify beyond due to less favorable conditions and high wind shear. Kappa has fluctuated between tropical storm and category 1 strength for several days while approaching northward. However, by October 14, its convection has collapsed and an irrevisble and final transition to an extratropical cyclone has took place. By October 14, Kappa had fully transition to an extratropical cyclone while heading for Iceland. By this time, the ridge that kept Kappa afloat had weakened, and by October 16, a larger extratropical cyclone had absorbed Kappa, fully ending its existence. Kappa caused heavy damages, reaching up to $450 million, mostly in Europe and Azores. It only killed 5.

Hurricane Iota

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Kappa 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK10-Kappa-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 6 – September 29
Peak intensity180 mph (285 km/h) (1-min)  902 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave emerged into the Atlantic Ocean on September 5. A well-defined low-pressure area already existed, though convection initially remained limited. After a burst in deep convection, the wave was designated as Tropical Storm Iota at 21:00 UTC on September 6 approximately 200 mi southeast of the easternmost islands of Cabo Verde. Iota moved westward as dry air decreased, which allowed it to strengthen significantly, but moderate wind shear kept it gradual. On September 8, Iota had developed significantly and its compact organization allowed the NHC to upgrade it to a Category 1 hurricane at 18:00 UTC, as an eye had formed. Iota's intensification remained slow and gradual due to some dry air intrusion, but it continued regardless. On September 10 at 12:00 UTC, Iota had strengthened to a Category 2 and had started to move northwestward. Two days later, Iota had reached major hurricane strength and is now deepening fast as the eye started to clear up and convection further increasing within its center. On September 13, Iota had strengthened to a Category 4 and is continuously moving slowly. It later reached its initial peak intensity of 155 mph (250 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 921 millibars, putting Iota near Category 5 strength. However, an eyewall replacement cycle occurred which gradually weakened Iota. Dry air had also started to increase and penetrate Iota's clear eye, making it ragged. By September 16, Iota had weakened down to a Category 3 and further down to a minimal hurricane a few days later as it moved westward towards the Gulf Stream.

On September 19, Iota was upgraded back to a category 2, avoiding the northeastward move due to Kappa's influence. Iota had begun restrengthening as dry air decreased and EWRC finished. On September 20 at 12:00 UTC, Iota regained back its major hurricane strength and is starting to move southwards due to influence from Nu and Omicron to the east. On September 22 at 18:00 UTC, Iota reached Category 4 once again and is currently doing a loop due to the Fujiwhara effect from those two hurricanes, and later Iota started to move eastward. On September 24, Iota reached Category 5 strength, in which both Omicron and Nu are also in the same category at the same time. Iota also approaches Omicron's path, which sets for a collision course but Iota managed to speed up northeast before Omicron comes. The next day, Iota reached its peak intensity of 180 mph (280 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 902 millibars. Iota accelerated northeastward at a fast speed and is turning extratropical faster than most other storms. It is said that Iota might have been the fastest moving Category 5 hurricane as well. Iota weakened down to a Category 4 on September 6 and has turned northward instead due to outflow from Kappa. By September 28 it had slightly shifted eastward as it weakened to a Category 1 hurricane. By this point, Iota had lost much of its convection and tropical characteristics and a few hours later, it transitioned to an extratropical cyclone before being absorbed a day later. Iota didn't cause any major damage apart from some impact in the Caribbean due to its outflow, but no more than $20 million worth of damages are done. There are no reported fatalities from this tropical cyclone.

Hurricane Lambda

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hanna 2020-07-25 1640Z.jpg GREEK11-Lambda-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 7 – September 16
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  970 mbar (hPa)

On September 6, an area of low pressure started to emerge from North Carolina. This system is currently very disorganized and is moving eastward, but it eventually emerged towards the Gulf Stream later that day. It had a strange southward movement where a massive HPA is pulling tropical weather systems against the Gulf Stream. As a result, this low pressure area oddly moved southward, which is extremely rare for any Gulf Stream tropical cyclones. Eventually, this would gain further convection as evironmental conditions become more favorable for tropical cyclogenesis. On September 7 at 18:00 UTC, the National Hurricane Center found compact organization from the system and upgraded it to a tropical depression. The next day at 12:00 UTC, it was upgraded to Tropical Storm Lambda. Lambda moved southward but after approaching the Bahamas, it turned westward and approached Florida. Later on September 10, Lambda struck Florida and on September 11 at 06:00 UTC, Lambda was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane as it emerges towards the Gulf of Mexico. It moved westward and gradually intensified. On September 13 at 00:00 UTC, Lambda reached Category 2 strength and eventually reached its peak intensity of 110 mph (175 km/hr) at 970 millibars. Few hours later, Lambda struck Texas at peak intensity and subsequently started to weaken. The next day, it degenerated to a remannt low and eventually dissipated.

Hurricane Mu

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Mu 2020-Farm.jpg GREEK12-Mu-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 10 – September 18
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  925 mbar (hPa)

On September 8, the NHC began to monitor an area of disturbed weather over Puerto Rico for possible development. Over the next day, convection rapidly increased, became better organized, and formed a broad area of low-pressure on September 9. The next day at 18:00 UTC, the system had organized enough to be designated as a tropical depression. The next day, the system strengthened to Tropical Storm Mu while situated over Bahamas. Northwesterly shear caused by an upper-level low caused the system to have a sheared appearance, but it continued to strengthen as it gradually moved north-northwestward. Mu eventually strengthened on September 12 at 18:00 UTC to a Category 1 hurricane while passing over Florida Keys. Mu remained sheared for some time, halting intensification and slowing it down due to marginal conditions. Eventually, it started to intensify again as a large convection bursted as it stalled down and it continued to gain strength and became a Category 2 hurricane on September 15. Mu began to go through a period of rapid intensification as it reaches major hurricane status while moving slowly northeastward. It further reached Category 4 strength on September 16 and it was upgraded to a Category 5 later that day, featuring a massive convection with clear eye. Mu made landfall on September 17 at 00:00 UTC with peak winds of 160 mph (260 km/hr) and minimum pressure of 925 millibars. The storm rapidly weakened as it moved slowly inland, weakening to a minimal hurricane later that day and to a tropical storm the next day. It further weakened to a tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on the same day before degenerating into a remnant low at 21:00 UTC. Mu caused $18 billion worth of damages and killed 35 people.

Hurricane Nu

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Nu 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK13-Nu-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 12 – September 26
Peak intensity195 mph (315 km/h) (1-min)  882 mbar (hPa)

The NHC began to monitor a tropical wave over Africa early on September 8. By the afternoon of September 12, the disturbance, then located several hundred miles west of Africa, had become better defined, and at 21:00 UTC by the next day, the NHC designated it as a tropical depression. After overcoming persistent northerly shear, the system became better organized and strengthened into Tropical Storm Nu at 00:00 UTC on September 15. The storm continued to intensify, with an eye beginning to form later that day. Satellite data received shortly after 12:00 UTC the following day indicated that Nu had quickly intensified into a Category 1 hurricane. The storm continued to intensify, becoming a Category 2 hurricane on September 17 at 12:00 UTC. Some slight westerly wind shear briefly halted intensification but when the shear decreased, Nu rapidly re-intensified into a major hurricane at 06:00 UTC on September 18. Nu further strengthened into a Category 4 hurricane the next day at 06:00 UTC. Nu continued to intensify significantly while moving northward towards the Central Atlantic, later reaching Category 5 strength on September 20 at 12:00 UTC. Afterward, Nu entered a period of a slowdown as it further deepened while continuously slowing down in the northward direction. It reached its peak intensity on September 22 at 12:00 UTC with 1-minute winds of 195 mph (315 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 882 millibars.

It maintained its intensity for several days before internal fluctuation and an eyewall replacement cycle caused the storm to weaken Nu down to a Category 4 on September 24 at 18:00 UTC as it approaches Bermuda. Nu had further weakened down to a Category 3 as the environmental conditions worsen. On the morning of September 27, the hurricane's internal structure deteriorated substantially, causing its eye to nearly dissipating, and by 15:00 UTC Nu had weakened to Category 2 intensity, in which it struck Nova Scotia afterward. However, Nu managed to keep its organization for some time while moving northwards as it makes another landfall in Labrador, weakening it down to a Category 1. As Nu began to undergo an extratropical transition on September 29, while moving toward Nova Scotia, its windfield expanded greatly. Nu eventually entered Baffin Bay while still a fully tropical hurricane, and it is expected at that time to strike Greenland as a tropical hurricane. However, the extratropical transition finished on that day at 12:00 UTC before crossing Greenland. The storm then made landfall in Greenland as a weakening extratropical storm. Nu caused some damages in Bermuda and Newfoundland, $175 million in total.

Hurricane Xi

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Joyce (2018 - Hype - Sim).png GREEK14-Xi-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 14 – September 25
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  961 mbar (hPa)

In the early hours of September 14, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. The disturbance steadily organized, and the NHC issued a special advisory to designate the system as a tropical depression at 09:00 UTC on September 16. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Xi on Septmber 17 at 00:00 UTC as it organized while moving northwestward. Despite strong shear partially caused by Hurricane Nu's outflow, Xi managed to intensify further while moving westward. Eventually, the wind shear started to wane and Xi started to form an eye. This prompted the NHC to upgrade it to a Category 1 hurricane on September 19 at 18:00 UTC. Xi started to move northward where it further strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane on September 21 at 18:00 UTC. However, heavy wind shear drom Hurricanes Nu and Omicron severely harmed Xi so it weakened down to a Category 1 the next day. It started to move away northeastward and the shear decreased, allowing it to restrengthen to a Category 2 on September 23 at 12:00 UTC. Xi reached its peak intensity of 110 mph (175 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 961 millibars. Xi managed to maintain its strength for some more time before weakening again on September 25 at 06:00 UTC while interacting with Kappa's outflow. Xi started to lose tropical characteristics as it speeds up northeastward. Eventually next day, Xi turned extratropical while maintaining hurricane-strength winds and it was absorbed by a larger extratropical cyclone while over Faroe Islands.

Hurricane Omicron

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Ernesto (2018 - Hype - Sim).png GREEK15-Omicron-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 15 – September 29
Peak intensity175 mph (280 km/h) (1-min)  913 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave and its associated broad low-pressure area emerged into the Atlantic from the west coast of Africa on September 12. A well-defined center of circulation formed on September 16. Stronger and more organized and convection appeared later that day, and later, the NHC designated a tropical depression on September 16 at 18:00 UTC. A scatterometer pass observed tropical-storm-force winds, which allowed NHC to upgrade it to Tropical Storm Omicron around 06:00 UTC on September 17. Dry air from the Saharan Air Layer slowed down intensification for a bit, but later it decreased, which allowed Omicron to organize gradually. By October 19, Omicron had strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane while situated in the MDR, in which favorable environmental conditions are heading for Omicron. Within the following days, Omicron had strengthened steadily, reaching Category 4 status on September 21 at 06:00 UTC. Omicron further reached Category 5 the next day while approaching the Greater Antilles. On September 24 at 12:00 UTC, Omicron reached its peak intensity of 175 mph (280 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 913 mbar while situated west of Greater Antilles. It encountered dry air again which weakened Omicron for the following days. However, as it moves north, Omicron managed to restrengthen a bit while at Category 4 strength, now approaching towards the Gulf Stream. By the following days, the cold water due to upwelling by the previous hurricanes gradually weakened Omicron. Omicron continues to cruise the Gulf Stream while steadily weakening, and it also started to lose tropical characteristics. By September 29, Omicron had transitioned to a post-tropical cyclone and it was absorbed on October 2 by a larger extratropical low. Omicron caused relatively little damage as it brushed the Greater Antilles and not making landfall.

Hurricane Pi

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Pi 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK16-Pi-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 15 – September 21
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  967 mbar (hPa)

A large, extratropical low-pressure area developed over the northeast Atlantic ocean on September 14, following the interaction between a surface front and an upper-level low. The low peaked with sustained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h) on September 15. Although the low weakened as it headed south-southeastward, the wind field contracted and convection began forming closer to the circulation due to marginally warm sea surface temperatures and sufficient instability. By 06:00 UTC on September 17, the system developed into Subtropical Storm Pi. Pi moved southward towards the Azores Islands and began strengthening. On the next day at 18:00 UTC, Pi transitioned to a tropical storm while moving eastward. Against all odds, Pi had strengthened further due to abnormally warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear. Hurricane hunters had determined that Pi had possessed hurricane-force winds and a ragged but organizing eye, which prompted the NHC to upgrade Pi to a Category 1 hurricane on September 20. Pi further strengthened at 18:00 UTC on the same day while approaching the Iberian Peninsula. Unexpectedly, it further strengthened to a Category 3 major hurricane with a clearing eye. Pi had further reached its peak intensity of 120 mph (195 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 967 millibars. Due to the hurricane category and the storm name, this hurricane is also dubbed "Hurricane 3.14". On September 21 at 06:00 UTC, Pi made landfall in Galicia, Spain at peak intensity.

Despite land interaction and literal location, Pi had only weakened down to a Category 1 hurricane as it emerged towards the Bay of Biscay six hours later. Pi continued to possess tropical features but it also started to expand significantly. By this point, Pi currently has winds of 90 mph (150 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 977 millibars, making it the strongest hurricane in the Bay of Biscay. On September 22 at 06:00 UTC, Pi made landfall on the western coast of France with winds of 85 mph (140 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 979 millibars, making it the strongest ever hurricane to strike France. Due to the rare French landfall, people from different French regions that experience tropical cyclones and those in France itself dubbed the hurricane "l'ouragan", for being the only hurricane to strike Metropolitan France. Eventually, Pi crossed France and emerged from Normandy. There is a debate whether Pi remains a tropical system or an extratropical one once it reaches the English Channel, but as it struck England, it had officially transitioned to an extratropical cyclone but maintaining hurricane-force winds later that day. It later emerged towards the North Sea and was last spotted north of the Faroe Islands before being absorbed by an extratropical cyclone. Pi remains the strongest hurricane to strike continental Europe and the strongest to strike both Spain and France. Due to Pi's strength and size, its damage is also massive, reaching $8.4 billion in total, mostly in Spain, Portugal, France, and the United Kingdom. 45 people were killed overall.

Hurricane Rho

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Rho 2020-Farm.jpg GREEK17-Rho-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationSeptember 16 – September 26
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  922 mbar (hPa)

On September 12, the NHC began to monitor a trough that had formed over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Development of the system was not expected at the time due to strong upper-level winds produced by Hurricane Mu. The disturbance nonetheless persisted, moving southwestward into the southwestern Gulf of Mexico where it began to organize as Mu moved away into the Southeastern United States early on September 15. The next day, hurricane hunters found a closed circulation, and as thunderstorms persisted near the center, the NHC initiated advisories on the tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on September 16. At 06:00 UTC on September 17, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Rho. Although affected by wind shear and dry air, the storm continued to intensify, and later that day, it strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. Suddenly, wind shear rapidly decreased and SSTs warmed, which allowed Rho to rapidly intensify to a Category 4 on September 18 at 12:00 UTC. Rho moved slowly moving northwestward. On September 20 at 18:00 UTC, hurricane hunters found intense winds near the eyewall which allowed the NHC to upgrade Rho to a Category 5 hurricane. It reached its peak intensity of 160 mph (260 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 922 millibars. However, it suddenly weakened due to upwelling and increasing dry air. Rho continued to weaken, and made landfall in Texas at 18:00 UTC on September 22, with winds of 75 mph (120 km/h). Afterward, Rho fell to tropical depression status at 06:00 UTC on September 24. A day later, Rho degenerated to a remnant low.

Hurricane Sigma

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Sigma 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK18-Sigma-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 2 – October 11
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  932 mbar (hPa)

On October 1, the NHC spotted an area of low pressure off the coast of the Colombia-Venezuela border. This tropical weather system moved westward and started to organize fairly quickly, and the ASCAT pass showed complete organization a day later. The NHC eventually upgraded the system to a tropical depression at 15:00 UTC on October 2. 15 hours later, the depression developed into Tropical Storm Sigma, while located off the eastern coast of Honduras. Sigma organized, but increased wind shear left the center exposed, causing it to weaken to a tropical depression by 15:00 UTC on October 4 after striking the Yucatan Peninsula. Sigma weakened some as it passed over the northern Yucatán, then emerged over the southern Gulf of Mexico early on October 5 and it reintensified to a tropical storm as conditions started to look favorable. Sigma reached Category 1 hurricane strength a day later, in which the outflow from the explosively intensifying Hurricane Tau boosted its intensification quite a bit. Sigma then rapidly intensified to a Category 4 hurricane on October 7 at 12:00 UTC while touching Tau's extremely powerful structure to the east. Later that day, Sigma reached its peak intensity of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 932 millibars while cruising in the Bay of Campeche. Increased wind shear started to weaken Sigma over time, putting it down to a Category 2 at 18:00 UTC on October 9 as it struck Mexico. After landfall, Sigma rapidly deteriorated, dissipating just after a few hours. Numerous tropical cyclone watches and warnings were issued for much of Mexico due to the storm. Sigma produced strong winds, heavy rainfall, flash flooding, landslides, and mudslides in the region. At least 14 fatalities have been confirmed.

Hurricane Tau

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Tau 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK19-Tau-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 3 – October 12
Peak intensity240 mph (390 km/h) (1-min)  842 mbar (hPa)

On October 1, the NHC began to monitor a tropical wave located a few hundred miles east of the Lesser Antilles for potential development. Later, at 21:00 UTC on October 2, the system was classified as Potential Tropical Cyclone Fourty. By 18:00 UTC on October 3, it had become sufficiently organized to be labeled a tropical depression. The system continued to gain strength and at 18:00 UTC it was designated Tropical Storm Tau, while located roughly 100 mi (160 km) south of Jamaica. Tau initially moved westward with little development, but on October 6 at 00:00, Tau intensified to a hurricane. Tau soon began to rapidly intensify, reaching Category 4 strength 12 hours later. By 18:00 UTC on the same day, it had intensified to a Category 5. This is mainly due to extremely high temperatures in the Caribbean and the decrease of wind shear which allowed rapid intensification. This rate of intensification is one of the most rapid ever recorded, jumping up by 85 mph in just 18 hours, which is like a 4.5 mph increase per hour. Tau continued to rapidly intensify at an unprecedented rate while continuously gaining more strength from the warm Western Caribbean. By the next 6 hours, Tau had reached winds of 200 mph (320 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 876 millibars while moving just a little. Eventually, Tau continued to intensify even further, and on October 8 at 00:00 UTC, Tau reached its peak intensity of 240 mph (390 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 842 millibars. This makes Tau the strongest Atlantic hurricane storm ever recorded, surpassing 2019 Ingrid's record (previously 235 mph) for the highest winds and 2017 Rita's record (previously 854 millibars) for the lowest pressure. Tau also dropped around 150 mph in a span of two days, making it the quickest and largest drop of pressure ever recorded. Tau's structure looked extremely intense but not extremely massive, as much of the winds are confined inside the small but extremely intense eyewall.

However, just after a few hours, Tau started to level off as ocean waters have become slightly cooler to support Tau's intensification. By 12:00 UTC on October 8, Tau had possessed winds of 220 mph (350 km/hr) and its pressure has dropped to 869 mbar while passing east of Yucatan Peninsula. As it enters the Gulf of Mexico, conditions have become slightly less favorable for the storm to keep its insanely intense structure, so it gradually weakened over the course of days. However, it managed to keep Category 5 strength for quite a bit of time as its outflow had influenced Sigma's path and intensity. By October 9, Tau had largely maintained its strength from before, and at 18:00 UTC, Tau made landfall on New Orleans, Louisiana with winds of 220 mph (350 km/hr) and slightly lower pressure of 872 millibars. After landfall, Tau started to weaken and degrade significantly. On October 10 at 00:00 UTC, Tau had been downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane. However, its weakening is slow as it remained a major hurricane for the following twelve hours, causing extreme damage along the way. On October 11 at 00:00 UTC, Tau weakened to a Category 1 hurricane while passing Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. It is thought that Tau remained a tropical hurricane as it crosses Canada before transitioning to an extratropical cyclone six hours later. At 12:00 UTC on the same day, Tau was absorbed by another extratropical low. Tau is one of the worst Atlantic hurricanes to impact Louisiana and the Midwest, causing $457 billion worth of damages, which also includes extreme damages from the Yucatan region. It also killed 2,350 people, mostly in Mexico and Louisiana.

Hurricane Upsilon

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Teddy-2020.jpeg GREEK20-Upsilon-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 15 – October 26
Peak intensity140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min)  941 mbar (hPa)

The NHC started monitoring a non-tropical low late on October 14. It slowly organized and gained convection as it meandered southeast of Bermuda. Early on October 15, the NHC issued a special advisory on the system as it became more well-defined, dubbing it Tropical Depression Forty-One as it became nearly stationary. The depression remained stagnant and unorganized for several days due to marginal weather conditions. On October 17 at 12:00 UTC, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Upsilon, and then gradually intensified the following day as it completed a small counter-clockwise loop. An eye soon became apparent on infrared satellite images, and Upsilon strengthened into a hurricane at 18:00 UTC on October 19. Intensification remained fairly slow due to marginal conditions, but at 18:00 UTC on October 21, an NOAA hurricane hunter aircraft reported that the storm had strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane. Upsilon strengthened to a Category 3 the next day as it approaches Bermuda, and it further reached Category 4 at 21:00 UTC. Upsilon reached its peak intensity of 140 mph (220 km/h) and pressure of 941 mbar three hours later. By 12:00 UTC on October 23, the storm started to weaken with the eye becoming increasingly cloud-filled, and Upsilon was downgraded to a Category 3 hurricane, and down to a Category 2 just few hours later. The eye began to re-emerge later in the day though reconnaissance aircraft found the storm had already weakened to a Category 1 hurricane at 15:00 UTC on October 24 as it moved northeastward toward the north extent of the Gulf Stream and encountered colder sea surface temperatures. By the morning of October 25, its wind field was beginning to grow again as the hurricane began its extratropical transition, and by the next day, at 06:00 UTC, Upsilon transitioned to an extratropical cyclone.

Hurricane Phi

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Delta 2020-10-06 1255Z.jpg GREEK21-Phi-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 17 – October 28
Peak intensity140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min)  946 mbar (hPa)

On October 15, the National Hurricane Center monitored an area of low pressure over the Main Development Region. This system moved westward and started to show signs of organization as it entered a favorable environment for intensification. On October 17 at 15:00 UTC, hurricane hunters have found sufficient organization along with the weather system, which prompted the NHC to designate it as a tropical depression. Intensification was initially gradual due to marginal conditions, but the next day at 18:00 UTC, it was upgraded to Tropical Storm Phi. The storm rapidly organized, reaching Category 1 strength the next day 12:00 UTC. While moving across the Caribbean, Phi's eye started to clear up gradually as it intensifies further. On October 20 at 15:00 UTC, Phi was upgraded to a Category 2 hurricane and to a major hurricane on October 21 at 00:00 UTC. Twelve hours later, it further intensified to a Category 4 hurricane and reached its peak intensity of 140 mph (220 km/hr) and 946 millibars before striking the Yucatan Peninsula at peak intensity. Phi weakened down to a minimal hurricane while entering the Gulf of Mexico. It managed to maintain its strength and made landfall again at 00:00 UTC on October 23 with winds of 80 mph (130 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 979 millibars. Phi rapidly degenerated afterward and it already dissipated just after twelve hours

Hurricane Chi

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Omar 2050 Image.png GREEK22-Chi-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 23 – October 30
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  923 mbar (hPa)

On October 21, a low pressure area has been designated over the Caribbean. It gradually organized within the following days as contitions become more favorable. At 06:00 UTC on October 23, a system had organized enough to be designated as a Tropical Depression. At 00:00 UTC the following morning, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Chi, Despite experiencing some north-northwestwardly shear, Chi steadily intensified, and reached hurricane strength by 08:00 UTC on October 25. Chi further strengthened due to less shear, reaching Category 2 strength on October 26 at 06:00 UTC. Six hours later, Chi strengthened to a Category 3 hurricane. It made landfall north of Tulum, Quintana Roo at 00:00 UTC the next day with winds of 120 mph (195 km/h) and a pressure of 955 mbars. Chi weakened to a minimal hurricane while inland at 09:00 UTC. Dry air wrapped around the northern half of Chi's circulation as it moved off shore into the Gulf of Mexico, leaving the center partially exposed. It become better organized late on October 27, with a ragged eye feature and deep convection and visible. At 06:00 UTC, Chi became a major hurricane again as it began another rapid intensification phase. Chi reached Category 4 strength six hours later. It continued to strengthen until it reached its peak intensity of 155 mph (250 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 923 mbar as it made landfall at 06:00 UTC on October 29. Chi steadily weakened after landfall, falling to tropical storm status over central Alabama at 00:00 UTC on October 30, before transitioning into a post-tropical cyclone 18 hours later. The remnants of Chi then moved quickly out over the Atlantic. Strong winds and rain caused flooding and damaged infrastructure in Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula and much of Gulf Coast as they were recovering from the previous hurricanes. Overall, Chi caused $35 billion worth of damages and 48 deaths.

Hurricane Psi

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Psi 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK23-Psi-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationOctober 28 – November 17
Peak intensity190 mph (305 km/h) (1-min)  886 mbar (hPa)

On October 25, the NHC began to monitor a tropical wave located a few hundred miles east of the Lesser Antilles for potential development. Later, a new tropical depression formed at 15:00 UTC on October 28. Tropical Storm Psi was designated on October 29 at 06:00 UTC. Psi started to gradually strengthen due to favorable environmental conditions and lower wind shear in the Caribbean. On October 30 at 00:00 UTC, Psi was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane as hurricane hunters have spotted higher wind speeds and a forming eye. The next day at 00:00 UTC, Psi was upgraded to a Category 2 hurricane, and it further intensified to a major hurricane six hours later. Psi started to undergo rapid intensification as it gained further strength and by 12:00 UTC it had grown into a Category 4 hurricane. Finally, after three hours, Psi reached Category 5 strength. Psi continued to intensify even further as sea surface temperatures remain very warm for further deepening. Psi also started to slow down as it deepens further. On November 2 at 00:00 UTC, Psi reached its peak intensity of 190 mph (305 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 886 millibars. Some dry air intrusion weakened the storm slightly, but it managed to maintain its strength before making landfall south of Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua on the same day at 18:00 UTC with winds of 180 mph (285 km/r) and a minimum pressure of 904 millibars. Psi weakened overland, as it dropped down to Category 1 strength on November 4 while emerging off the coast of Honduras. Psi further weakened down to a tropical storm as dry air intrusion increased but on November 5 at 12:00 UTC, Psi started to strengthen again and reached Category 1 strength while moving northeast. Psi weakened overland, as it dropped down to Category 1 strength on November 4 while emerging off the coast of Honduras. Psi further weakened down to a tropical storm as dry air intrusion increased but on November 5 at 12:00 UTC, Psi started to strengthen again and reached Category 1 strength while moving northeast.

Psi moved eastward and made landfall over Cuba on November 5 at 18:00 UTC. Psi fluctuated in intensity and started to move westward due to influence from a ridge of high-pressure area. On November 6 at 21:00 UTC, Psi struck the Florida Keys while moving westward, emerging into the Gulf of Mexico. Due to favorable conditions, Psi intensified again to a Category 2, then back to a Category on November 8 at 12:00 UTC. It made landfall again over Cuba at 18:00 UTC with winds of 115 mph (185 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 954 millibars. Psi weakened due to land interaction, and it struck Cuba again for the third time as a Category 1 on November 9 at 12:00 UTC. It continued to meander while moving eastward and is now moving northward as it approaches the Gulf Stream. Psi reintensified to a Category 2 on November 11 at 12:00 UTC while slowly expanding. It reached Category 3 strength the next day and has slowed down. The next day, Psi reached Category 4 strength and is now one of the largest hurricanes on record, stretching from Chicago to Newfoundland. On November 14 at 12:00 UTC, Psi once again reached Category 5 strength, with secondary peak winds of 160 mph (260 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 911 millibars. This marks one of the northernmost Category 5 hurricanes on record. It gradually weakened due to colder sea surface temperatures, as it makes landfall over New Hampshire as a large Category 3 hurricane on November 16 at 18:00 UTC. Psi continued to weaken, passing Montreal and Quebec City as a weak hurricane. On November 17, Psi finally transitioned to an extratropical cyclone but it remained a fairly strong one until being absorbed by a polar cyclone on November 19 south of Iceland. Psi is a very destructive hurricane, wreaking havoc across Cuba, Central America, and Eastern US. Overall, more than 4,200 fatalities were attributed to the storm, and total damages have reached around $275 billion.

Hurricane Omega

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Omega 2020 Farm.jpg GREEK24-Omega-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationNovember 7 – November 15
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  952 mbar (hPa)

On November 3, the NHC began monitoring a non-tropical area of disturbed weather in the central Atlantic for possible gradual subtropical development. A non-tropical low subsequently formed north of Lesser Antilles on November 4. The system became better organized as it began to detach from a frontal boundary during the following day. At 06:00 UTC on November 7, it developed into Subtropical Storm Omega. Omega moved northeastward and eventually completed its transition to a tropical storm the next day. It started to move towards areas with favorable conditions, and it managed to strengthen despite some wind shear. On November 10 at 18:00 UTC, satellite images received shortly revealed that Omega has strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. Omega continued to move northeastward across the North Atlantic with more favorable environmental conditions. On November 12 at 12:00 UTC, Omega has further strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane, and then Category 3 just six hours afterward. Omega reached its peak intensity of 120 mph (195 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 952 millibars before the effects of strong southwesterly shear started to weaken Omega. On November 14, Omega weakened down to a Category 1 while accelerating northeastward. At 18:00 UTC on the same day, Omega passed just a few miles north of the Canary Islands, making it the nearest hurricane to affect the islands. It eventually transitioned to an extratropical cyclone right just before striking Morocco. It is one of the most destuctive hurricanes to affect the Canaries and Morocco, causing $886 million worth of damages and killing 345 people.

Hurricane Alef

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Alef-2020 Farm.jpg HEBREW1-Alef-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationNovember 11 – November 19
Peak intensity230 mph (370 km/h) (1-min)  858 mbar (hPa)

A low-pressure area was spotted in the Lesser Antilles on November 9. It steadily moved westward and started to organize a bit. Some vertical wind shear initially blocked its organization but on November 11 at 12:00, ASCAT pass and Hurricane Hunters have observed significant organization which leads to NHC designating it as a tropical depression. Twelve hours later, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Alef, which is the first time a hurricane season got exhausted of Greek names due to extreme activity and opted to use Hebrew names instead to fill in more storms. Alef began to rapidly intensify on November 12, as convection started to wrap around its center and winds swiftly increasing. On November 13, Hurricane Hunters reported hurricane-force winds, which allows NHC to upgrade it to a Category 1 hurricane. Just eighteen hours later, Alef had rapidly intensified to a Category 4 hurricane due to extremely favorable conditions in the Caribbean. On November 14 at 12:00 UTC, NHC upgraded Alef to a Category 5 hurricane, concurring with Psi's intensification to the same category for the second time. As the Caribbean waters continued to warm significantly, Alef continued its steady rate of deepening. Just twelve hours later, Alef had already reached a pressure of 887 millibars. It attained its peak intensity with winds of 230 mph (370 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 858 millibars, making it the second most intense hurricane to ever exist just behind Tau.

As Alef was nearing its peak intensity, it passed very close to the Archipelago of San Andrés, Providencia, and Santa Catalina, with its eye missing Providencia by only a few miles. On November 15 at 18:00 UTC, the hurricane made landfall near the town of Haulover, Nicaragua at peak intensity. Its landfall location was approximately 26 km south of where Hurricane Psi made landfall two weeks earlier. Alef took a while to weaken, only weakening down to a Category 4 twelve hours later due to the extreme intensity. The hurricane crossed Central America while moving westward, weakening only gradually. On November 17, Alef emerged towards the Pacific Ocean while still at Category 2 strength. It continued to gradually weaken over the ocean due to colder sea surface temperatures and increasing wind shear in the Eastern Pacific. On November 18 at 06:00 UTC, Alef dropped below hurricane intensity. It made landfall over Southern Mexico as a tropical storm at 12:00 UTC, and it dissipated shortly afterward due to the rugged terrain of Mexico. When the National Hurricane Center panicked due to the storm's formation and the exhausting of Greek names, it was decided that Hebrew names will be used to name the remaining storms of the season, which lead to the hurricane getting the name "Alef". As a massive hurricane, Alef damaged much of the infrastructure of Providencia and caused widespread damaging flooding in much of Central America and parts of Mexico. There were at least 895 storm-related fatalities in the region, which was still recovering from the impacts of Hurricane Psi, although Hurricane Bet would worsen the situation. It caused a total of $6.8 billion worth of damages.

Hurricane Bet

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Bet 2020 Farm.jpg HEBREW2-Bet-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationNovember 17 – November 22
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  931 mbar (hPa)

A late tropical wave was spotted on November 16 on the Caribbean Sea. The conditions on the sea are quite favorable, although already affected by Alef's upwelling. However, the tropical wave still developed convection enough for it to be classified by NHC as Tropical Storm Bet on November 17 at 12:00 UTC. Bet moved westward but its intensification remained fairly slow due to marginal conditions and slightly warm surface temperatures. However, Bet managed to intensify to a Category 1 hurricane on November 19 at 12:00 UTC as ASCAT Pass and Hurricane Hunters have spotted stronger winds. At this point onwards, Bet suddenly encountered extremely warm waters, which allowed it to rapidly intensify in a matter of hours. Bet's convection is extremely huge as it started to rapidly intensify. Six hours later, Bet reached Category 2 strength while approaching westward. On November 20, Bet literally shocked everyone by rapidly intensifying to a Category 5 hurricane and reaching its peak intensity of 160 mph (260 km/hr) and a minimum pressure of 931 millibars. This marks the most sudden intensification within only hours. Shortly afterward, Bet struck the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. This marks the strongest hurricane to strike Costa Rica. Afterward, Bet rapidly weakened to a tropical storm on November 21 as it enters the Eastern Pacific basin. Eighteen hours later, Bet officially dissipated in the basin. Bet struck the area southern than where Psi and Alef struck. Due to this, the damage was widespread, affecting mostly Costa Rica. Bet caused $5.7 billion worth of damages and killed 145 people.

Hurricane Gimel

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Ophelia 2017-10-12 0415z.jpg HEBREW3-Gimel-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationNovember 27 – December 2
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

On November 27, a low-pressure area was spotted in the North Atlantic just south of Bermuda. Shortly afterward, it organized enough to be classified as a tropical depression by NHC at 12:00 UTC. The depression moved southward, organizing a little but it is moving into slightly more favorable conditions. The depression continued moving eastward, and it eventually entered favorable conditions as wind shear decreased. On November 29 at 18:00 UTC, the depression strengthened to Tropical Storm Gimel. Gimel remained very disorganized for some time until it started strengthening on December 1. At 18:00 UTC the same day, Gimel was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane. It reached its peak intensity of 90 mph (150 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 975 millibars. Gimel weakened down to a tropical storm on December 2 at 00:00 UTC, turning extratropical a day later. The extratropical remnants persisted until December 5 when it was absorbed near Britain.

Hurricane Dalet

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Dalet 2020 Farm.jpg HEBREW4-Dalet-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationNovember 29 – December 6
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  961 mbar (hPa)

An extratropical cyclone was spotted over the northern Atlantic on November 26. The extratropical system meandered for some time before starting to develop on November 28. On November 29 at 12:00 UTC, the extratropical cyclone has weakened a bit but eventually turned into a subtropical depression as it gains more tropical characteristics. It moved southward towards the Azores and started to gain strength, and on November 30 at 12:00 UTC, it was upgraded to Subtropical Storm Dalet by NHC. Dalet remained quite stationary for several days as it gathers convection, but it also started to intensify further. On December 2 at 12:00 UTC, Dalet fully transitioned to a tropical storm with winds of 60 mph (95 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 991 millibars. Dalet gradually intensified while remaining in the same position, but favorable environmental conditions and warmer than normal SSTs allowed Dalet to intensify to a Category 1 hurricane on December 5. Dalet moved southwestward, reaching Category 2 strength on December 6 at 12:00 UTC. It further reached Category 3 strength twelve hours later, marking one of the few hurricanes to reach major hurricane strength on the month of December. It reached its peak intensity of 115 mph (185 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 961 millibars. Dalet gradually weakened over time due to worsening environmental conditions, dropping below hurricane strength on December 9 at 12:00 UTC. Dalet transitioned back to an extratropical cyclone shortly afterward.

Hurricane He

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Alex 2016-01-14 0335Z.jpg HEBREW5-He-Farm-2020-WMHB.png
DurationDecember 28, 2020 – January 5, 2021
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  977 mbar (hPa)

An extratropical cyclone transitioned into Subtropical Storm He on December 29 at 12:00 UTC. He started to move southwards several hundred miles, an unusual direction. He encountered mainly marginal environmental conditions while moving southward and passing just east of Bermuda. He remained fairly disorganized for several days until December 30, when it gained significant organization. At 18:00 UTC the same day, He transformed into a tropical storm while moving eastward. It started to encounter slightly more favorable environmental conditions for further intensification. On January 1, 2021, at 18:00 UTC, He intensified to a Category 1 hurricane, marking it a year-crossing hurricane. As the last hurricane of the season, it reached its peak intensity of 80 mph (130 km/h) and 937 millibars before starting to weaken considerably due to cooler SSTs. On January 3 at 03:00 UTC, He weakened down to a tropical storm, and it transitioned to an extratropical cyclone on January 4. Six hours later, He was absorbed by a larger extratropical cyclone.

Storm Names

The following list of names has been used for named storms that form in the North Atlantic in 2020. As more than 21 named storms have occurred this season, storms that form after Warren were assigned names corresponding to the letters of the Greek alphabet. When the Greek alphabet was eventually used up, storms that form after Omega were assigned names corresponding to the letters the Hebrew alphabet, which was used for the first time. The names not retired from this list will be used again in the 2027 season.

  • Astor
  • Blanche
  • Cristobal
  • Diana
  • Elvis
  • Fran
  • Gustav
  • Hailey
  • Ike
  • Jewel
  • Klaus
  • Laura
  • Marcel
  • Nova
  • Odion
  • Paulette
  • Ralph
  • Sheila
  • Theodore
  • Vicky
  • Warren

Greek Alphabet

Due to extreme activity, the Greek Alphabet was used this year.

  • Alpha
  • Beta
  • Gamma
  • Delta
  • Epsilon
  • Zeta
  • Eta
  • Theta
  • Iota
  • Kappa
  • Lambda
  • Mu
  • Nu
  • Xi
  • Omicron
  • Pi
  • Rho
  • Sigma
  • Tau
  • Upsilon
  • Phi
  • Chi
  • Psi
  • Omega

Hebrew Alphabet

Because of the extreme historic activity of this season, even the Greek Alphabet was exhausted. Thus, the Hebrew Alphabet was used for the first time. The first five letters were used in this season.

  • Alef
  • Bet
  • Gimel
  • Dalet
  • He
  • Vav (unused)
  • Zayin (unused)
  • Het (unused)
  • Tet (unused)
  • Yod (unused)
  • Kaf (unused)
  • Lamed (unused)
  • Mem (unused)
  • Nun (unused)
  • Samekh (unused)
  • Ayin (unused)
  • Pe (unused)
  • Tsadi (unused)
  • Qof (unused)
  • Resh (unused)
  • Shin (unused)
  • Tav (unused)

Retirement

In the spring of 2021, Farm River opened up a discussion for HHW users to submit their own suggested retirements and replacements, and it was decided that fifteen names will be retired: Fran, Paulette, Sheila, Theodore, Epsilon, Zeta, Eta, Mu, Pi, Sigma, Tau, Chi, Psi, Alef and Bet from its rotating naming lists due to the number of deaths and damage they caused, and they will not be used again for another Atlantic hurricane. They will be replaced with Fay, Phoebe, Susan and Troy for the 2026 season, respectively. This season has set the record for having the most retired names on record.

Eventually, it was decided that the use of the Greek and Hebrew list would be discontinued to avoid confusion. Instead, if the regular naming list is exhausted, an auxiliary list consisting of 21 given names would be used, which will allow the names to be retired.

Equivalents

Storm in this article In real life 2020 season
Astor [NEW]
Blanche Arthur
Cristobal Bertha
Diana [NEW]
Elvis Cristobal
Fran [NEW]
Gustav [NEW]
Hailey Dolly
Ike [NEW]
Jewel [NEW]
Klaus [NEW]
Laura [NEW]
Marcel [NEW]
Nova Edouard
Odion [NEW]
Paulette Fay
Ralph Gonzalo
Sheila Hanna
Theodore Isaias
Vicky TD Ten
Warren [NEW]
Alpha Josephine
Beta Kyle
Gamma [NEW]
Delta [NEW]
Epsilon Marco
Zeta Laura
Eta Nana
Theta Omar
Kappa Paulette
Iota Rene
Lambda [NEW]
Mu Sally
Nu Teddy
Xi Vicky
Omicron Wilfred
Pi Alpha
Rho Beta
Sigma Gamma
Tau Delta
Upsilon Epsilon
Phi [NEW]
Chi Zeta
Psi Eta
Omega Theta
Alef Iota
Bet [NEW]
Gimel [NEW]
Dalet [NEW]
He [NEW]

Season Effects

2020 Atlantic tropical cyclone season statistics
Storm
name
Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths


Astor March 12 – March 17 Tropical storm 60 993 Windward Islands, Trinidad and Tobago, The Bahamas $6 million None 
Blanche May 16 – May 23 Category 2 hurricane 105 971 Southeastern United States, The Bahamas, Bermuda, Cuba $75 million
Cristobal May 22 – May 28 Category 1 hurricane 75 987 Eastern United States, The Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica $345 million 12 
Diana May 29 – June 1 Tropical storm 60 990 None None None 
Elvis June 1 – June 8 Category 2 hurricane 110 964 Mexico and Central America $220 million 45 
Fran June 2 – June 11 Category 4 hurricane 150 931 Lesser Antilles, Greater Antilles, Jamaica, Cuba, The Bahamas, East Coast of the United States, Eastern Canada $27.8 billion 77 
Gustav June 4 – June 10 Category 2 hurricane 105 966 Central America, Yucatán Peninsula, Southern United States $2.3 billion 11 
Hailey June 25 – June 28 Tropical storm 45 1002 Eastern Canada Minimal None 
Ike June 28 – July 1 Category 1 hurricane 75 991 None None None 
Jewel June 30 – July 12 Category 3 hurricane 125 947 Yucatán Peninsula, Gulf Coast of the United States, East Coast of the United States, Eastern Canada $887 million
Klaus July 2 – July 5 Category 1 hurricane 85 982 None None None 
Laura July 3 – July 6 Category 1 hurricane 80 983 None None None 
Marcel July 4 – July 6 Tropical storm 60 995 Eastern Canada Minimal None 
Nova July 4 – July 7 Tropical storm 45 998 United Kingdom None None 
Odion July 5 – July 10 Tropical storm 70 990 Eastern Canada, Bermuda Minimal None 
Paulette July 6 – July 12 Category 3 hurricane 120 953 East Coast of the United States, Eastern Canada $21.6 billion 56 
Ralph July 16 – July 29 Category 4 hurricane 155 926 Leeward Islands, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Eastern United States, Atlantic Canada, Quebec $60 million
Sheila July 21 – July 28 Category 4 hurricane 150 938 Greater Antilles, Gulf Coast of the United States, Mexico, Cuba $7.8 billion 26 
Theodore July 25 – August 5 Category 5 hurricane 160 917 Cape Verde, Lesser Antilles, Greater Antilles, Turks and Caicos Islands, The Bahamas, East Coast of the United States, Eastern Canada $72 billion 103 
Vicky July 30 – August 8 Tropical storm 50 998 Cape Verde Minimal
Warren August 3 – August 12 Category 2 hurricane 110 962 Cabo Verde Islands, Bermuda, East Coast of the United States $15 million
Alpha August 10 – August 19 Category 4 hurricane 140 943 Cabo Verde Islands, Bermuda Minimal None 
Beta August 12 – August 18 Category 2 hurricane 100 973 The Carolinas None None 
Gamma August 13 – August 16 Category 1 hurricane 75 985 East Coast of the United States, Eastern Canada None None 
Delta August 14 – August 16 Tropical storm 40 1004 Mexico, Texas $50 million
Epsilon August 18 – August 28 Category 4 hurricane 150 931 Lesser Antilles, Venezuela, Central America, Greater Antilles, Yucatán Peninsula, Gulf Coast of the United States $63 billion 104 
Zeta August 15 – August 30 Category 5 hurricane 220 860 Cabo Verde Islands, Lesser Antilles, Greater Antilles, Yucatán Peninsula, Southern United States $145 billion 86 
Eta August 29 – September 4 Category 3 hurricane 115 962 Lesser Antilles, Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Central America, Southeastern Mexico $4.6 billion 75 
Theta August 30 – September 6 Category 2 hurricane 100 976 Southeastern United States, Bermuda, Scotland None None 
Kappa September 5 – October 16 Category 4 hurricane 155 924 Cabo Verde Islands, Bermuda, East Coast of the United States, Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands, Portugal, Spain $450 million
Iota September 6 – September 29 Category 5 hurricane 180 902 Senegal, The Gambia, Cabo Verde Islands, Greater Antilles $20 million None 
Lambda September 7 – September 16 Category 2 hurricane 110 970 Greater Antilles, Gulf Coast of the United States, Mexico, The Bahamas $3.7 billion 14 
Mu September 10 – September 18 Category 5 hurricane 160 925 The Bahamas, Cuba, Southeastern United States $18 billion 35 
Nu September 12 – September 26 Category 5 hurricane 195 882 Lesser Antilles, Greater Antilles, Bermuda, East Coast of the United States, Atlantic Canada $175 million
Xi September 14 – September 25 Category 2 hurricane 110 961 Cabo Verde Islands, Great Britain $605 million
Omicron September 15 – September 29 Category 5 hurricane 175 913 Cabo Verde Islands, Greater Antilles, Bermuda, Atlantic Canada $45 million
Pi September 15 – September 21 Category 3 hurricane 120 967 Portugal, Spain, France, England, Wales, Ireland, Belgium, Azores $8.4 billion 45 
Rho September 16 – September 26 Category 5 hurricane 160 922 Mexico, Gulf Coast of the United States $2.1 billion
Sigma October 2 – October 11 Category 4 hurricane 150 932 Mexico, Cayman Islands, Central America $3.6 billion 14 
Tau October 3 – October 12 Category 5 hurricane 240 842 Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Central America, Yucatán Peninsula, Gulf Coast of the United States $457 billion 2,350 
Upsilon October 15 – October 26 Category 4 hurricane 140 941 Bermuda Minimal None 
Phi October 17 – October 28 Category 4 hurricane 140 946 Greater Antilles, Mexico $305 million
Chi October 23 – October 30 Category 4 hurricane 155 923 Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Central America, Yucatán Peninsula, Gulf Coast of the United States, East Coast of the United States, Mexico $35 billion 46 
Psi October 28 – November 17 Category 5 hurricane 190 886 ABC Islands, San Andrés and Providencia, Central America, Mexico, Greater Antilles, The Bahamas, Eastern and Southeastern United States, Eastern Canada and Iceland $275 billion 4,221 
Omega November 7 – November 15 Category 3 hurricane 120 952 Canary Islands, Madeira, Morocco, Algeria $886 million 345 
Alef November 11 – November 19 Category 5 hurricane 230 858 Greater Antilles, ABC Islands, Venezuela, Colombia, San Andrés and Providencia, Central America, Mexico $6.8 billion 895 
Bet November 17 – November 22 Category 5 hurricane 160 931 ABC Islands, Venezuela, Colombia, San Andrés and Providencia, Central America, Mexico $5.7 billion 145 
Gimel November 27 – December 2 Category 1 hurricane 90 975 None None None 
Dalet November 29 – December 6 Category 3 hurricane 115 961 Azores Islands Minimal None 
He December 28 – January 5 Category 1 hurricane 80 977 None None None 
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