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2073 Atlantic Hurricane Season
2073FullSeasonMapHHJ
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedMay 29, 2073
Last system dissipatedDecember 27, 2023
Strongest storm
NameLinus
 • Maximum winds205 mph (335 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure863 mbar (hPa; 25.48 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions29
Total storms28
Hurricanes19
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
10
Total fatalitiesUnknown
Total damageUnknown
Atlantic hurricane seasons

The 2073 Atlantic hurricane season was a hyperactive, destructive, and devastating season that produced approximately 28 named storms, with 19 of them becoming hurricanes, and 10 of them becoming major hurricanes. The season officially began on June 1, 2073, and ended on November 30, 2073. These dates historically describe the period each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first system of the season, Abigail, formed on May 29, prior to the official start of the hurricane season. while the final storm of the season, Grady, dissipated on December 7, around a month after the end of the season. This season began a string of multiple hyperactive seasons to come.

Seasonal Timeline

Hurricane Vernon2073 Atlantic hurricane season (HHJ)#Hurricane Tiffany2073 Atlantic hurricane season (HHJ)#Hurricane Simon2073 Atlantic hurricane season (HHJ)#Hurricane Pedro2073 Atlantic hurricane season (HHJ)#Hurricane Linus2073 Atlantic hurricane season (HHJ)#Hurricane AbigailSaffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale

Systems

[WIP]

Hurricane Abigail

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Abigail2073ImageHHJ Abigail2073TrackHHJ
DurationMay 29 – June 7
Peak intensity155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  918 mbar (hPa)
On May 27, the NHC began to monitor a disturbed area of weather was located several hundred miles east of the Bahamas. The disturbance moved westwards but struggled to organize. Eventually, on May 29 the disturbance formed a closed circulation and was designated as a Tropical Storm, receiving the name "Abigail". The storm gradually moved southwestwards, slowly intensifying as it moved toward the Bahamas. After moving over the Bahamas as a strong Tropical Storm, the storm curved westwards and continued to strengthen. Abigail made landfall in the Florida Keys as a strong Tropical Storm with winds of around 70 mph. After moving into the Gulf of Mexico, the storm strengthened into a Hurricane on June 1. Abigail continued to move northwestwards, continuing to intensify as hours would pass. By June 3, the storm had intensified into a Major Hurricane, and also started to drift southwestwards. The storm continued to gradually intensify, becoming a Category 4 Hurricane on June 4. Hurricane warnings were issued for the coast of Texas that same day. Abigail turned northwestwards again, further fueling the storm's intensification. After tracking northwards, the storm sharply curved towards the west, and Tropical storm-force winds began impacting the coast of Texas. During the early hours of June 6, Abigail made landfall in Texas as a Category 4 Hurricane with winds of around 145 mph. The storm then began to weaken drastically after moving inland, weakening into a Tropical Storm later that day. Abigail degenerated into a remnant low and merged with a frontal system on June 7. Abigail's remnants would continue to bring heavy rains across the northeastern United States.

Hurricane Brandon

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Brandon2073ImageHHJ Brandon2073TrackHHJ
DurationJune 28 – July 5
Peak intensity95 mph (155 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)
Late on June 27, the NHC began to monitor a Tropical wave located in the open Atlantic. The system initially showed moderate chances of developing. The disturbance formed a closed circulation and was designated as Tropical Depression Two on June 28. The depression continued moving though the Atlantic, but struggled to initially intensify due to moderate wind-shear. The system eventually strengthened into a Tropical Storm by June 29, and received the name "Brandon". The next day, the storm made a sharp curve towards the south, hindering intensification of the storm. The storm then turned westwards again, and found a favorable area for intensification. On July 1, Brandon became a Category 1 Hurricane, and the storm continued to intensify further throughout the day. The next day, on July 2, Brandon intensified into a Category 2 Storm, but only held this strength for just around 12 hours or so, before weakening back down due to increasing wind-shear. Tropical Storm watches were issued for the Lesser Antilles on July 3, as the storm began turning northwestwards. Brandon weakened into a Tropical Storm on July 4, and the storm's convection was exposed east of the storm, showing signs of the storm degenerating. On July 5, the storm degenerated into a Tropical wave northeast of the Windward Islands. Brandon's remnants continued moving through the open atlantic and brung heavy rains to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Tropical Storm Connie

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Connie2073ImageHHJ Connie2073TrackHHJ
DurationJuly 11 – July 14
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)
A non-tropical low formed off the coast of South Carolina on July 10, and the NHC began monitoring the disturbance. The disturbance showed signs of development as it moved into the open waters of the Atlantic. The system gradually acquired tropical characteristics, eventually forming a closed circulation and being designated as a Tropical Storm on July 11, and receiving the name "Connie". The storm slowly moved northeastwards and intensified. Tropical Storm warnings were issued for the east coast of the United States the same day the storm formed. Connie would dump major amounts of rain across the northeast over the next 48 hours. The storm peaked just southeast of Long Island, and started to accelerate to the northeast. Connie began to undergo an extratropical transition on July 14, and officially dissipated the same day.

Tropical Storm Devin

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Devin2073ImageHHJ Devin2073TrackHHJ
DurationJuly 26 – July 28
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)
On July 25, the NHC began monitoring a disturbed area of weather associated with a Tropical wave was located a couple hundred miles west of the Lesser Antilles. The system eventually formed a closed circulation and was designated as a Tropical Depression on July 26. The storm gradually intensified, and became a Tropical Storm during the early hours of July 27, receiving the name "Devin". The storm continued to track northwestwards, even with having unorganized cloud tops, and a lack of a defined circulation. The storm entered an area of higher wind-shear and began to weaken, being downgraded to a Depression on July 28. Approximately 12 hours later, Devin degenerated into a tropical wave, and continued to track through the Caribbean sea.

Hurricane Eveline

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Eveline2073ImageHHJ Eveline2073TrackHHJ
DurationAugust 18 – August 24
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  982 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began monitoring a broad tropical wave located just east of the Windward Islands on August 17. The system quickly organized and became a Tropical Depression just east of Puerto Rico on August 18. Just twelve hours after forming, the system made landfall in Puerto Rico. After making landfall, the depression quickly degenerated into a tropical wave. The remnants would track across the Bahamas over the next 72 hours, struggling to re-organize. The system would eventually re-form a closed circulation by August 21, and was designated as a Tropical Depression. The system entered favorable conditions for intensification, and the storm reached Tropical Storm status later on August 21, receiving the name "Eveline". Tropical Storm watches and warnings were issued across the southeastern United States late on August 21. The storm then began to undergo steady intensification, becoming a Hurricane on August 22. As soon as the storm had intensified, Hurricane Warnings were issued for the coasts of North and South Carolina. The storm weakened slightly before making landfall, as Eveline had weakened to a Tropical Storm during the early hours of August 23. Eveline made landfall in North Carolina during the afternoon of August 23, as a borderline hurricane with winds of approximately 70 mph. After moving inland, the storm rapidly weakened, and degenerated into a remnant low by the evening. The remnants of the storm would eventually merge with a frontal system, and bring flooding rains to the northeastern United States.

Hurricane Fergus

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Fergus2073ImageHHJ Fergus2073TrackHHJ
DurationAugust 23 – September 2
Peak intensity140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min)  946 mbar (hPa)
On August 22, a tropical wave started being monitored by the NHC, as the system showed signs of development. The system gradually organized and gained tropical characteristics. The system then formed a closed circulation and became a Tropical Storm on August 23, receiving the name "Fergus". As the storm tracked toward the west, it gradually intensified over the warm Atlantic waters. Fergus eventually intensified into a Hurricane on August 25. While dry air had initially prevented the storm from rapidly intensifying, the storm eventually drove the dry air out of its circulation, causing the storm to intensify into a Major Hurricane by August 26. Dangerous rip-tides started to affect the Lesser Antilles and the Windward Islands, causing several deaths among the islands. Fergus continued to intensify further, becoming a Category 4 hurricane on August 27. The storm then started to curve northwards, and the storm started to undergo an eye-wall replacement cycle, causing slight weakening of the system. Fergus reached a secondary peak intensity just before starting to loop on August 30. The storm looped around several hundred miles south of Bermuda, and curved northeastwards after finishing its loop. By the time Fergus recurved out to sea, it had drastically weakened into a Category 1 hurricane. The storm entered much cooler waters, and continued to weaken, while also starting to undergo extratropical transitioning by September 2. 12 hours after weakening back down into a Tropical Storm, Fergus became an extratropical low and continued to track across the North Atlantic. The storm's remnants would eventually go on to merge with another non-tropical cyclone that would affect the United Kingdom.

Hurricane Glenda

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Glenda2073ImageHHJ Glenda2073TrackHHJ
DurationAugust 29 – September 4
Peak intensity115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  961 mbar (hPa)
Early on August 28, the NHC began monitoring a disturbed area of low pressure associated with an off-season tropical gyre. The disturbance began to gradually organize, showing higher chances of cyclone development. The system formed a closed circulation and became Tropical Storm Glenda on August 29. The storm gradually tracked towards the northeast, and encountered favorable surface conditions for intensification. By August 30, Glenda had intensified into a Hurricane, and watches were issued for Cuba that same day. On August 31, the storm began to undergo rapid intensification, becoming a Major Hurricane in the span of 12 hours. Hurricane Warnings were issued for Cuba on August 31, as tropical storm-force winds began to affect the island that day. Glenda slightly weakened over the next 18 hours, due to increasing interaction with land. On September 1, the storm made landfall in Cuba as a Category 2 Hurricane with winds of approximately 105 mph. The storm caused devastation across the Island due to its fast movement. After the storm made landfall, it quickly weakened down to a Tropical Storm early on September 2, and making landfall on the Island of Nassau in the Bahamas. Glenda continued to track across the Northern Atlantic, gradually weakening as it drifted at a rapid pace. The storm weakened into a Depression late on September 3, and eventually degenerated into a remnant low during the early hours of September 4.

Tropical Storm Horace

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Horace2073ImageHHJ Horace2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 5 – September 7
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)
A disturbed area of low pressure located north of Cuba began to be monitored by the NHC on September 4. The system quickly organized and within 18 hours of being designated, the system formed a closed circulation and became a Tropical Depression. The depression moved northwards and meandered off the coast of Florida, bridging gale-force winds to surrounding areas. By September 6, the depression had intensified into a Tropical Storm and received the name "Horace", Tropical storm warnings were issued for the coastlines of Georgia and South Carolina that same day. Late on September 6, Horace made landfall near the Georgia-South Carolina border as a minimal Tropical Storm with approximately 40 mph winds. Only 12 hours after making landfall, the storm degenerated into a large remnant low over the Eastern United States.

Hurricane Isla

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Isla2073ImageHHJ Isla2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 5 – September 10
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  984 mbar (hPa)
On September 4, the NHC began monitoring a tropical disturbance off the coast of Honduras. The low initially struggled to organize due to high amounts of wind-shear surrounding the system. The disturbance eventually formed a closed circulation and was designated as a Tropical Storm on September 5, recovering the name "Isla". Hurricane watches were issued for the coast of Belize and surrounding areas that same day. Due to very favorable conditions in excess of the storm, Isla began to steadily intensify, becoming a Hurricane on September 6. Around 12 hours before making landfall, the storm peaked briefly before slightly weakening due to increasing land interaction. The storm made landfall in Belize on September 7 as a Tropical Storm with winds of 70 mph. Isla moved inland and rapidly weakened, becoming a Depression during the early hours of September 8. Isla then entered the Bay of Campeche, and began to re-intensify. By the early hours of September 9, the system had re-intensified into a Tropical Storm. After tracking across the Bay of Campeche, Isla made its second landfall in Mexico as a 45 mph Tropical Storm on September 10. The storm then moved inland and quickly degenerated into a remnant low over Mexico later on September 10.

Hurricane Justin

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Justin2073ImageHHJ Justin2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 6 – September 19
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  948 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began monitoring a disturbed tropical low in the Caribbean sea on September 5. The disturbance rapidly organized and became a Tropical Depression by September 5. The system slowly drifted towards the west, while also intensifying at a slow pace due to cooler waters in the wake of Tropical Storm Isla. Despite the cooler waters, the system still was upgraded to a Tropical Storm on September 6, and received the name "Justin". Tropical Storm warnings were issued across the coastlines of Central American countries that same day. As the storm started to meander around the coast of Honduras, the storm dumped moderate amounts of rain across the country and surrounding areas, and flooding was limited due to the storm's small size. The storm continued to slowly move across the Caribbean, dumping rains across the Yucatán Peninsula. Due to large amounts of land interaction, Justin briefly weakened back down to a Tropical Depression late on September 10. Justin re-intensified and began curving eastwards on September 11. The storm eventually made landfall in the Yucatán Peninsula as a Tropical Storm on September 13, with winds of approximately 50 mph. Due to the storm's slow movement, Justin quickly weakened into a minimal Tropical Depression 6 hours after making landfall, but still maintained Tropical Characteristics after exiting land on September 14.

Justin then entered the Gulf of Mexico and found more favorable conditions for intensification, and re-attained Tropical Storm status on September 15. Later that same day, the storm began moving to the northwest, and Tropical Storm Warnings and watches were issued across the Gulf of Mexico, ranging from Texas to Alabama. Starting on September 16, Justin began accelerating in movement. 24 Hours before making its second landfall, the storm began to undergo rapid intensification due to very low wind-shear on September 17. In the span of 12 hours, Justin went from a 65 mph Tropical Storm to a 120 mph Major Hurricane, and Tropical Storm Warnings across Texas and Louisiana were upgraded to Hurricane Warnings. Justin made its final landfall near the Texas-Louisiana border as a Category 3 Hurricane with winds of 120 mph. Justin then moved into the mainland United States, and quickly weakened back down to Tropical Storm Status just 12 hours after landfall. The storm then degenerated into a remnant low on September 19, and the remnants of the storm would continue moving across the United States over the next several days.

Tropical Storm Karolyn

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Karolyn2073ImageHHJ Karolyn2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 14 – September 17
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  999 mbar (hPa)
On September 10, the NHC began monitoring a non-tropical low pressure system located northwest of Bermuda. The disturbance meandered across the atlantic for the 72 hours, struggling to organize. The system eventually acquired subtropical characteristics and became Subtropical Storm Karolyn on September 14. Karolyn gradually moved northwards, changing in direction over the next 24 hours. Karolyn became a Tropical Cyclone on September 15. The storm would gradually intensify as it tracked towards the northeast, with the help of the warm waters of the Gulf Stream. However, soon after the storm peaked, it began to drastically weaken due to higher amounts of wind-shear hindering the structure of the storm. By September 17, Karolyn had weakened into a Tropical Depression, and officially dissipated twelve hours later.

Hurricane Linus

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Linus2073ImageHHJ Linus2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 18 – September 30
Peak intensity205 mph (335 km/h) (1-min)  863 mbar (hPa)
On September 16, The NHC began monitoring a Tropical wave off the coast of Africa. The disturbance gradually tracked towards the northwest, showing signs of organization. The system formed a closed circulation on September 18, and was designated as a Tropical Storm, receiving the name "Linus". The storm took an odd path, curving towards the northeast shortly after forming. On September 20, the storm starting tracking towards the west, gradually intensifying in the process. Linus intensified into a Hurricane late on September 20, but started to encounter higher amounts of wind-shear, which prevented the storm from intensifying substantially. Even with the large amounts of wind-shear, Linus managed to intensify into a Category 2 Hurricane later on September 21, but weakened soon after due to an influx of dry air in the storm's circulation. After the dry air exited the storm's convection, Linus intensified into a Major Hurricane on September 22, and would continue to rapidly intensify due to very favorable conditions across the open Mid-Atlantic.

Due to the substantial rate of intensification, Linus intensified into a Category 5 Hurricane on September 23, making it the easternmost Category 5 storm on record. 18 hours after becoming a Category 5, the storm weakened slightly, down to a Category 4, but later re-intensified early on September 25. The storm began entering very warn sea surface temperatures in excess of 32 °C, causing the storm to intensify further, and to grow in size. The storm reached its record peak intensity just east of the Bahamas, with a 30-mile-wide eye-wall, with Tropical Storm-force winds extending up to 450 miles outside of the storm's center. Linus began turning northwestwards late on September 27, and Hurricane watches were issued for the coastlines of North and South Carolina, with Tropical Storm Warnings and Watches extending as far out as Virginia. Linus began to weaken slightly as it aimed for the coast of the Carolinas, and maintained winds in excess of around 185 mph. The Hurricane watches were upgraded to hurricane warnings on September 28. Linus began approaching the Carolinas, bringing major storm surge and tropical storm-force winds as soon as the evening of September 28. On September 29, The storm made landfall near Topsail Beach in North Carolina as a Category 5 Hurricane with winds of approximately 165 mph, making it the first storm to ever make landfall in North Carolina at Category 5 intensity. Storm Surge in excess of 25 ft eroded beaches across the North Carolina coastline, and the shear size of the tides caused over 100 deaths in the course of 12 hours. As the storm quickly moved inland, it rapidly weakened into a Tropical Depression just 18 hours after making landfall. By the evening hours of September 30, the storm degenerated into a remnant low and merged with a frontal system.

Due to the extreme intensity of the storm when making landfall, it became one of the costliest Tropical cyclones to make landfall in the continental United States, causing over $300 billion in terms of damages. This storm also caused the second largest evacuation in history, Just behind Hurricane Omar of 2020, with over 6 million people having to evacuate due to the storm's large size and extreme winds.

Hurricane Maggie

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Maggie2073ImageHHJ Maggie2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 22 – September 25 (Exited Basin)
Peak intensity75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  989 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began to monitor a disturbed area of low pressure in the Caribbean on September 21. The disturbance gradually tracked towards the west, slowly organizing. The system eventually formed a closed circulation by September 22, and was designated as a Tropical Depression. The depression gradually tracked towards the west, intensifying over warmer waters. The system became a Tropical Storm on September 24, and received the name "Maggie". Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for the coasts of Nicaragua and Honduras. Maggie began to rapidly intensify due to almost non-existent wind-shear, and became a Hurricane just 12 hours after being designated as a Tropical Storm. The storm steered towards land, and eventually made landfall near the border between Nicaragua and Honduras early on September 25 as a Category 1 Hurricane. Maggie then moved inland and rapidly weakened due to the interaction it had with land. The storm had weakened into a Depression on September 25, and moved into the Pacific Ocean. Maggie would retain its Atlantic name after entering the Eastern Pacific, and would go on to became a Major Hurricane that impacted western Mexico.

Hurricane Noah

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Noah2073ImageHHJ Noah2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 27 – October 4
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  961 mbar (hPa)
Late on September 25, the NHC began to monitor a tropical wave located in the MDR. The disturbance gradually tracked towards the west, but struggled to organize due to moderate amounts of dry air surrounding the center of the storm. By September 27, the disturbance formed a closed circulation despite the abundance of dry air and was designated as a Tropical Storm, receiving the name "Noah". The storm had struggled to intensify due to excessive interaction with dry air. On September 28, the storm began making a turn towards the north, further preventing intensification. Later that same day, Noah hooked sharply towards the south before eventually moving westwards again by September 29. The storm intensified into a Hurricane on September 30. Noah continued to gradually intensify, becoming a Category 2 Hurricane late on October 1. Hurricane warnings were issued in Venezuela for the first time in over 100 years. The storm weakened while approaching land, due to slightly higher wind-shear. Noah made landfall in northeastern Venezuela on October 3 as a Category 1 Hurricane with winds of 80 mph. After making landfall, the storm began moving northwestwards, weakening down into a Tropical Storm in the process. Around 18 hours after making landfall, the storm entered the Caribbean as a minimal Tropical Storm, and continued to weaken due to high amounts of wind-shear. Noah degenerated into a Tropical wave on October 4, and the storm's remnants would go on to bring heavy rains to Puerto Rico.

Tropical Storm Oddrun

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Oddrun2073ImageHHJ Oddrun2073TrackHHJ
DurationSeptember 28 – September 30
Peak intensity55 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began monitoring a disturbed tropical wave off the coast of Africa on September 27. The disturbance gradually tracked towards the north and showed signs of organization. The storm formed a closed circulation by September 28 and was designated as a Tropical Depression. The depression gradually moved towards the north, entering an area of favorable conditions for intensification. The system intensified into a Tropical Storm on September 29, receiving the name "Oddrun". Over the next day, the storm's forward movement continued to accelerate and continued to intensify. Late on September 29, the storm began to undergo extratropical transitioning, and completed this process on September 30. Oddrun's remnants would eventually go on to make landfall Portugal on October 2.

Hurricane Pedro

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Pedro2073ImageHHJ Pedro2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 1 – October 8
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min)  944 mbar (hPa)
On September 30, the NHC began monitoring a broad area of low pressure associated with a large tropical gyre located in the southern Caribbean. Due to the very favorable conditions, the disturbance quickly organized and was designated as a Tropical Storm during the early hours of October 1, receiving the name "Pedro". As soon as the system formed, Tropical Storm warnings were issued for the coast of Honduras. The storm brung flooding rains to the coast of Honduras over the next 24 hours. Pedro began to turn northwards on October 2, and Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for the eastern coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. On October 3, just before the storm entered the Gulf of Mexico, it had intensified into a Hurricane, and watches were issued for the coast of Florida with a forecasted landfall having the storm making landfall as a Category 2 storm.

Starting on October 4, the storm began to undergo rapid intensification, becoming a Category 2 approximately 12 hours after becoming a Hurricane, and the storm intensified into a Major Hurricane later that same day. The Hurricane Watches that had been issued for the coast of Florida got upgraded into Hurricane Warnings, and Storm Surge warnings were also issued. Pedro continued to intensify, becoming a Category 4 Hurricane during the later hours on October 4, and tropical storm-force winds began to affect the coast of Florida. The storm made landfall early on October 5 in Florida near Horseshoe Beach at peak intensity, with winds of approximately 130 mph. Pedro moved through Florida, delivering flooding rains and devastating storm surge in excess of up to 20 feet. The storm weakened drastically after moving through the state, moving out of the state as a minimal Category 1 Hurricane on October 5. On October 6, the storm weakened down to a Tropical Storm, due to cooler sea surface temperatures and an influx of wind-shear. Despite these conditions, Pedro re-intensified into a Hurricane on October 7 after moving into the warmer water associated with the Gulf Stream. Pedro weakened back down into a Tropical Storm late on October 7, and began to undergo extratropical transitioning. Pedro became an extra-tropical cyclone on October 8 just southeast of Nova Scotia, and continued to track across the North Atlantic.

Tropical Storm Rayanne

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Rayanne2073ImageHHJ Rayanne2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 7 – October 10
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)
Late on October 6, the NHC began monitoring a disturbed tropical wave was located several hundred miles north of the Windward Islands. The disturbance quickly acquired tropical characteristics and formed a closed circulation by October 7, becoming Tropical Storm Rayanne. The storm gradually moved to the northwest, slowly intensifying in the process. On October 8, Tropical Storm Watches were issued for the coast of North Carolina, due to the forecasted impact the storm would have. Rayanne had peaked just southeast of the Carolinas, and began to steadily weaken afterwards. On October 9, Rayanne began curving northeastwards, entering cooler waters with higher amounts of wind-shear. Early on October 10, Tropical Storm watches and warnings were discontinued for the North Carolina coastline, and Rayanne began to undergo extratropical transitioning. Rayanne officially degenerated into a remnant low and merged with a frontal system exiting the Eastern United States on October 10.

Tropical Depression Eighteen

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Eighteen2073ImageHHJ Eighteen2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 10 – October 11
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1011 mbar (hPa)
A broad disturbed area of low pressure was located off the coast of the Lesser Antilles late on October 8. The system slowly tracked towards the northwest and organized over the next 48 hours. The system formed a closed circulation and was designated as a Tropical Depression on October 10. Tropical Storm watches were issued for the Windward Islands once the storm formed. Over the next several hours, the depression slowly moved toward the northwest, brining flooding rains to the Windward Islands. However, due to the storm's unorganized structure and high amounts of wind-shear surrounding the storm, the depression degenerated into a Tropical Wave on October 11. The remnants of the storm would go on to bring flooding rains and gale-force winds to Puerto Rico.

Hurricane Simon

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Simon2073ImageHHJ Simon2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 12 – October 26
Peak intensity175 mph (280 km/h) (1-min)  904 mbar (hPa)
On October 10, the NHC began monitoring a large tropical disturbance was located in the Open MDR several hundred miles west of Cabo Verde. The disturbance slowly organized over the course of the next 36 hours, as large amounts of dry air hindered rapid organization. The disturbance formed a closed circulation by October 12 and was designated as a Tropical Depression. The storm began to intensify as it tracked westwards, becoming a Tropical Storm later on October 12, receiving the name "Simon". The system gradually tracked toward the west, while also intensifying. By early on October 14, Simon had intensified into a Hurricane, and Hurricane Watches were issued for the Lesser Antilles around the same time. Roughly 24 hours before passing though the Lesser Antilles on October 16, Simon became a Category 2 Hurricane. Throughout October 17, the storm ravaged the Lesser Antilles, brining strong winds and major storm surge to the area. Later on October 17, Simon intensified into a Major Hurricane. Because of the anticipation of the storm hitting Jamaica, Hurricane Watches were issued for the island of Jamaica early on October 18. By early on October 19, Simon further intensified into a Category 4 Hurricane, and hurricane warnings were issued for Jamaica and surrounding areas. Starting on October 20, the storm dumped large amounts of rain across Jamaica, while also bombarding the island with winds over 135 mph. While the storm did not make direct landfall on the island, the storm caused excessive damages to Jamaica. Later on October 20, Simon weakened slightly and began curving westwards, entering an area of very favorable conditions. By Late on October 22, Simon had rapidly intensified into a Category 5 Hurricane, and hurricane warnings were issued for the Yucatán Peninsula. During the morning of October 23, the storm made landfall in the Yucatán Peninsula as a Category 5 Hurricane with winds of approximately 170 mph. The storm weakened drastically after making landfall, weakening into a category 2 hurricane around 12 hours after making landfall. On October 25, the storm made landfall close to Brownsville in Texas as a Category 4 Hurricane with winds of around 130 mph. Simon then began to move inland, and rapidly weakened, becoming a Tropical Storm around 24 hours after making landfall. On October 26, the storm degenerated into a remnant low that would eventually go on to merge with an Alberta Clipper late on October 27, resulting a huge snowstorm that ravaged the northeastern United States.

Hurricane Tiffany

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Tiffany2073ImageHHJ Tiffany2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 14 – October 20
Peak intensity185 mph (295 km/h) (1-min)  890 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began to monitor a disturbed tropical low in the eastern Caribbean early on October 13. The disturbance gradually organized over the next several hours and eventually became a Tropical Storm on October 14, receiving the name "Tiffany". The storm gradually moved towards the northwest over the next 24 hours, with Tropical Storm warnings being issued for all of Haiti later on October 14. Several hours before making landfall, Tiffany intensified into a Category 1 Hurricane. Tiffany made landfall in Haiti on October 15 as a Category 1 Hurricane with winds of around 85 mph. The storm then continued moving northwestwards, intensifying into a Category 2 Hurricane just 12 hours after making landfall. Hurricane warnings were issued for the Bahamas late on October 15 as the southernmost islands began getting tropical storm-force winds. Tiffany began to rapidly intensify and became a Major Hurricane later on October 16, and Hurricane Warnings along with Storm Surge Warnings were issued for all of southern Florida. Just 18 hours after attaining major hurricane status, Tiffany had intensified into a Category 5 Hurricane, and a State of Emergency was declared for the state of Florida on October 17. Tiffany reached its peak in terms of intensity just 12 hours before making landfall, and Extreme Wind Warnings were issued for Miami and multiple surrounding areas. The storm made landfall directly on the city of Miami on October 18 as a Category 5 Hurricane with winds of approximately 165 mph, making it one of the strongest storms to ever hit the state of Florida. The storm continued moving through eastern Florida, brining major damages to surrounding areas, Including those of Fort Lauderdale, Okeechobee, and Orlando. Tiffany gradually weakened over the next 24 hours, weakening down to a Tropical Storm around 24 hours after making landfall. Tiffany continued to bring strong winds and flooding rains to the states of Georgia and Tennessee. Tiffany weakened into a Depression late on October 19, and the storm began degenerating. Tiffany fully degenerated into a non-tropical frontal system over the Eastern United States on October 20. The storm's remnants would continue to bring heavy rains across the northeastern coast of the United States over the next few days.

Hurricane Tiffany ended up becoming the costliest tropical cyclone in recorded history due to the direct impact the storm made on major cities of Florida. The damages from the storm were described as "unimaginable", and "apocalyptic", mostly due to the substantial damages to the city of Miami. The storm also became the first disaster on record to cause over >$500 billion in damages. This storm received the nickname of "The Resort Destroyer", due to the storm causing major damages to famous resorts in Orlando.

Hurricane Vernon

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Vernon 2073 10292073 Vernon2073Path
DurationOctober 20 – November 15
Peak intensity145 mph (230 km/h) (1-min)  929 mbar (hPa)
Main Article: Hurricane Vernon

On October 18, the NHC began monitoring a non-tropical low pressure system located a couple hundred miles south of Bermuda. The disturbance looped in the Atlantic, and showed signs of organization. The disturbance eventually fully acquired subtropical characteristics and became a Subtropical Storm on October 20, receiving the name "Vernon".

Hurricane Wolfie

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Wolfie2073ImageHHJ Wolfie2073TrackHHJ
DurationOctober 30 – November 6
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  979 mbar (hPa)
The NHC began monitoring a low pressure trough located south of Puerto Rico on October 28. The disturbance gradually moved northwards, while dumping heavy rains across Puerto Rico as it slowly organized. The system eventually formed a closed circulation and became a Tropical Storm on October 30, receiving the name "Wolfie". The storm gradually moved towards the northwest, struggling to intensify due to cooler waters in the wake of Hurricane Vernon. A frontal trough began to interact with the storm, steering the storm towards the east, further hindering intensification. Wolfie began to make a loop in the Atlantic finishing the looping process by late November 4. The constant changes in direction limited intensification of the storm, but once the storm started moving northwestwards again, the system began to intensify gradually. Wolfie became a Hurricane on November 5, and began accelerating in a northeasterly direction. The storm began to undergo an extratropical transition on November 6, due to the proximity of the storm's location in coordination with higher wind-shear and colder waters. Wolfie became a post-tropical low later on November 6. The storm's remnants would continue to move across the North Atlantic, and would eventually go on to affect the United Kingdom, brining gale-force winds and high surf.

Tropical Storm Angelo

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Angelo2073ImageHHJ Angelo2073TrackHHJ
DurationNovember 10 – November 14
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1001 mbar (hPa)
On November 9, the NHC began monitoring a broad tropical wave located north of Honduras. The disturbance gradually acquired tropical characteristics, eventually forming a closed circulation by November 10 and becoming a Tropical Depression. The system slowly intensified and by early on November 11, the system had become a Tropical Storm. Because of the NHC running out of names to use, they used the first name off of a new Auxiliary list for the storm, thus naming the storm, "Angelo". The storm made landfall shortly after being designated making landfall in the Yucatán Peninsula as a minimal Tropical Storm on November 11 with winds of approximately 40 mph. Angelo then weakened into a Depression shortly after making landfall, and the structure of the storm rapidly deteriorated. After entering the Gulf of Mexico, the storm slowly re-intensified into a Tropical Storm, re-attaining said intensity on November 12. Tropical Storm watches and warnings were issued for the coast of Texas the same day. The storm gradually moved northwestwards, brining high-surf to the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Angelo eventually made its final landfall in Texas late on November 13 as a Tropical Storm with winds of 45 mph. After moving inland again, the storm weakened gradually, and eventually degenerated into a large remnant low over the Midwest United States on November 14.

Hurricane Brookelynn

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Brookelynn2073ImageHHJ Brookelynn2073TrackHHJ
DurationNovember 13 – November 24
Peak intensity100 mph (160 km/h) (1-min)  969 mbar (hPa)
A disturbed area of low pressure was located several hundred miles northeast of the Bahamas on November 12, showing signs of organization. The system formed a closed circulation by November 13 and was designated as a Tropical Storm, receiving the name "Brookelynn", the second name off the new Auxiliary list. The storm began curving towards the east on November 13.

Hurricane Cameron

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Cameron2073ImageHHJ Cameron2073TrackHHJ
DurationNovember 17 – November 24
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  956 mbar (hPa)
Early on November 17, the NHC began monitoring a broad area of disturbed weather associated with a tropical gyre was located north of Honduras, with the system showing signs of development. The disturbance rapidly organized and was designated as a Tropical Depression later on November 17. The storm struggled to intensify due to land interaction, but eventually became a Tropical Storm by November 18, and received the name "Cameron". The storm then slowly moved northwards, gradually intensifying over the next 36 hours. Cameron then intensified into a Hurricane late on November 19. The storm made landfall in the Yucatán Peninsula in northern Belize on November 20 as a Category 1 Hurricane with winds of 80 mph. After making landfall, Cameron only weakened slightly due to unusually low wind-shear and warm sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico. Cameron re-intensified into a Hurricane later on November 21. By November 22, Cameron had rapidly intensified into a Category 3 Major Hurricane, with the appearance of a well-defined eye on satellite imagery.

Hurricane Warnings were issued for the coastlines Louisiana and Mississippi, along with additional Storm Surge warnings being issued that same day. Before making landfall, Cameron slightly weakened down into a Category 2 Hurricane, as tropical storm-force winds began affecting Louisiana. The Storm made landfall in Louisiana on November 23 as a borderline Major Hurricane with winds of approximately 110 mph. Due to making landfall on Thanksgiving of its respective year, the storm received the nickname "The Great Thanksgiving Hurricane". The storm moved inland and rapidly weakened down to a Tropical Storm by early on November 24. Cameron degenerated into a remnant low over North Carolina late on November 24. The storm's remnants would eventually go on to bring flooding rains and gale-force winds to the New England coast.

Tropical Storm Dory

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dory2073ImageHHJ Dory2073TrackHHJ
DurationNovember 21 – November 23
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)
A non-tropical low located west of the Azores began to be monitored by the NHC on November 20. The disturbance moved towards the east and quickly formed a closed circulation by November 21, becoming Tropical Storm Dory. Dory tracked southeastwards, only intensifying lightly due to its rapid movement. Tropical Storm-force winds affected all of the Azores from the storm. The structure of the storm began to deteriorate due to cold sea-surface temperatures and very high wind-shear. Dory degenerated into a post-tropical low pressure system on November 23, and continued to meander across the Atlantic over the next 48 hours.

Hurricane Edward

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Edward2073ImageHHJ Edward2073TrackHHJ
DurationNovember 29 – December 4
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)
On November 28, the NHC began to monitor a broad tropical wave located just off the Lesser Antilles. The disturbance gradually showed signs of organization and eventually formed a closed circulation on November 29, becoming a Tropical Storm and receiving the name "Edward". The storm gradually moved towards the west, slowly intensifying. Starting on December 1, Edward began turning northwards, and Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for the Dominican Republic. On December 2, the storm made landfall in the Dominican Republic as a strong tropical storm with winds of approximately 65 mph. After making landfall, Edward maintained its intensity, and the storm's structure remained fairly organized. Once exiting land, Edward began to intensify further, becoming a Hurricane on December 3. After passing east of the Bahamas, the storm hooked towards the northeast, entering an area of much cooler sea surface temperatures. Edward weakened down into a Tropical Storm late on December 3, and the storm's structure began to fall apart. The storm began to undergo an extratropical transition while moving over Bermuda, in which the storm made landfall as a 65 mph Tropical Storm. Edward became a post-tropical low on December 4, and continued to move across the Atlantic over the next 24 hours before being absorbed by a stronger trough on December 5.

Hurricane Fallyn

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Fallyn2073ImageHHJ Fallyn2073TrackHHJ
DurationDecember 8 – December 13
Peak intensity95 mph (155 km/h) (1-min)  976 mbar (hPa)
A large trough associated with a tropical gyre began being monitored by the NHC on December 7. The disturbance curved northeastwards and eventually formed a closed circulation by December 8, and was designated as a Tropical Depression. The storm curved towards the east and slowly intensified. Early on December 10, the depression intensified into a Tropical Storm, receiving the name "Fallyn". Shortly after becoming a Tropical Storm, the system hooked northwestwards, preventing further intensification. early on December 11, the storm began moving eastwards, and entered an area of unusually favorable sea-surface temperatures. Later during the day on December 11, Fallyn intensified into a Hurricane. The storm brung high surge to the Florida Keys during the later hours of December 11. By December 12, Fallyn ended up briefly intensifying into a Category 2 Hurricane, around six hours later the storm weakened back down due to encountering higher amounts of wind shear. Early on December 13, the storm began to undergo extratropical transitioning. The storm became an extratropical low on December 13 several hundred miles east of the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

Tropical Storm Grady

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Grady2073ImageHHJ Grady2073TrackHHJ
DurationDecember 25 – December 27
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)
On December 24, a non-tropical low pressure system located in the Caribbean sea began being monitored by the NHC. Over the span of 24 hours, the system gradually organized and eventually became a Tropical Depression by December 25. Despite the off-season sea surface temperatures, the depression intensified into a Tropical Storm later that day and received the name "Grady". The system slowly tracked northwestwards over the next 36 hours, struggling to intensify. The storm quickly degenerated into a remnant low on December 27 due to very unfavorable conditions. Grady's remnants would continue to track across the Caribbean sea over the next few days.

Season Effects

[WIP]

Storm Names

The following names were used for named storms that formed in the North Atlantic in 2073. The names not retired from this list were used again in the 2079 season. This is the last list of the 6 new rotating lists implemented by the World Meteorological Organization back in 2068. Names that were not assigned are marked in gray.

  • Abigail
  • Brandon
  • Connie
  • Devin
  • Eveline
  • Fergus
  • Glenda
  • Horace
  • Isla
  • Justin
  • Karolyn
  • Linus
  • Maggie
  • Noah
  • Oddrun
  • Pedro
  • Rayanne
  • Simon
  • Tiffany
  • Vernon
  • Wolfie

Auxiliary List

Starting this year, due to the high amount of tropical cyclones that formed, the NHC resorted to using a new list of names for when they run out of names to use from the main list. Whenever all names are used from this list, the NHC will start using the Greek alphabet.

  • Angelo
  • Brookelynn
  • Cameron
  • Dory
  • Edward
  • Fallyn
  • Grady
  • Holly (unused)
  • Igarian (unused)
  • Jordan (unused)
  • Kaleb (unused)
  • Lucy (unused)

Retirement

In April 2074, the World Meteorological Organization retired the names Abigail, Glenda, Linus, Pedro, Simon, Tiffany, Vernon, and Cameron from its rotating name list due to the amounts of damages and deaths they caused. They were replaced with Alyssa, Gisela, Lazlo, Pollux, Silas, Timna, Vencel, and Clifford for the 2079 season.

In 2074, the WMO declared that names can be officially retired from the Auxiliary List, and can be replaced with new names.

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